A Jinty Sampler, Part I

I have been wanting to do a bit of a ‘core sample’ through my pile of issues, to show the way that Jinty changed over time, and indeed to ask myself whether there were any changes that weren’t so obvious to spot. Additionally, this would give blog readers a bit of a consolidated view of the issues in the middle and end of Jinty‘s run, which otherwise will take a while for me to get to, if I post details of individual issues at around the rate of 1 or 2 a week. (Yes, it did only just register with me in preparing this post that I have about 350 individual issues of Jinty!)

This is therefore the first of a few related posts giving some summary information about the format and printing details of the comic, taking samples every 25 issues or so.

  1. Issue 1: 11 May 1974.
    • Extent and print details: 40 pages. Cover and back cover are in full colour, 16 pages in duotone (red and black).
    • Cover design: story montage (boxy).
    • Content: 12 stories; 3 are humour strips, 2 are gag strips.
    • Regular artists include Mario Capaldi, José Casanovas, Rodrigo Comos, Ana Rodrigues, Phil Gascoine
  2. Issue 25: 26 October 1974.
    • Extent and print details: 32 pages. Cover and back cover are in full colour, 13 pages in duotone (red and black). (That is, one of the pages that could have been a duotone was printed in just black.)
    • Cover design: Jinx story page.
    • Content: 11 stories; 3 humour strips, 2 gag strips.
    • Regular artists include Jim Baikie, José Casanovas, Carlos Freixas, Ana Rodrigues, Phil Townsend
  3. Issue 50: 10 May 1975 (missing, so details below are from 3 May 1975)
    • Extent and print details: 32 pages. Cover and back cover are in full colour, 12 pages in duotone (red and black).
    • Cover design: single image; competition illustration.
    • Content: 9 stories; 3 humour, no gag strips.
    • Regular artists include Jim Baikie, Mario Capaldi, José Casanovas, Phil Gascoine, Ana Rodrigues, Trini Tinturé, Phil Townsend
  4. Issue 75: 1 November 1975 (missing, so details below are from 8 November 1975)
    • First issue of merged comic Jinty and Lindy
    • Extent and print details: 36 pages. Cover and back cover are in full colour, 6 pages in duotone (blue and black).
    • Cover design: story montage (boxy).
    • Content: 11 stories; 1 humour, 1 gag strip.
    • Regular artists include Jim Baikie, Mario Capaldi, Carlos Freixas, Phil Gascoine, Trini Tinturé, Phil Townsend
  5. Issue 100: 24 April 1976
    • Extent and print details: 32 pages. Cover and back cover are in full colour, 12 pages in duotone (blue and black).
    • Cover design: story montage (boxy).
    • Content: 10 stories; 1 humour, 1 gag strip.
    • Regular artists include Jim Baikie, Mario Capaldi, José Casanovas, Phil Gascoine, Ana Rodrigues, Trini Tinturé, Phil Townsend

It’s hard to do a very structured comparison of the story types between issues, because there are such a lot of themes that are covered within the general category of an ongoing story. I have separated out humour strips and gag strips as I think these are generally distinct enough from the ‘mainstream’ sort of story that really characterises a weekly comic. Girls’ comics pretty much all have gag strips (a page or less that has no ongoing narrative arc and which is basically there for the ‘gag’ ending) and humour strips (a story that can be a bit longer each issue, and which has a little more depth and narrative drive, while still basically being there for the chuckle or pratfall ending). What distinguishes one girls’ title from another are the sorts of serial stories that are included: spooky spine-chillers with a surprise ending in Misty, hard-hitting social realism in Tammy, and science fiction or fantasy in Jinty.

Looking purely at these non-humour or gag stories, we can see that the first 50 issues of Jinty don’t really strongly feature the fantastical element this title becomes well-known for. Indeed, around issue 50 there is quite a focus on ‘slave’ stories, with “Merry At Misery House” still running and “Tricia’s Tragedy”, “Dora Dogsbody”, and “Cinderella Smith” also featuring elements of coercion. By issue 75 the fantastical element is creeping in, with “Golden Dolly, Death Dust!”, and in issue 100, apocalyptical science fiction story “Fran of the Floods” is cementing the trend towards more regular inclusion of fantastical elements other than the purely spooky/haunting story.

As far as the ‘cover design’ item above is concerned, I am distinguishing between ‘story montage (boxy)’ and ‘story montage (free-form)’, where the latter includes more than one panels from the internal contents but combines them in a fluid design. We will see these in subsequent Jinty issues.

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4 thoughts on “A Jinty Sampler, Part I

  1. Thanks for such a comprehensive undertaking! I’ll be interested to see any story theme changes when Jinty merges with other titles. 🙂

    1. Thanks for the comment, glad the analysis looks interesting to someone else, not just me! I suspect that mergers will show a minimal amount of effect on Jinty as there were really only two of these (the Lindy one already covered and the Penny one later on, in 1980 I think). So I think the main changes in story themes will come from natural evolution within Jinty rather than outside of the title.

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