Tag Archives: Cinderella Smith

Jinty 23 August 1975

Cover Jinty 23 Aug 1975

(Cover artist: Mario Capaldi)

This fantastic cover by Mario Capaldi is full of energy and (literal) bounce. I like the fact that Capaldi (and other Jinty artists) didn’t feel constrained to stick to a neat panel grid, either, though arguably that second panel is a little squashed in.

I’m not quite sure, looking back, how much it’s the case that Jinty is really starting to hit its stride by now and how much it’s just that these are issues I know better than the earliest issues. Certainly I remember some of the stories particularly fondly: ‘The Valley of Shining Mist’, where the rolling in of the mist turns an abandoned set of ruins into a cottage with a mysterious and helpful mother-figure inside; and ‘Face The Music, Flo!’ shows off Jim Baikie’s art more to advantage than some of the earlier Jinty stories he illustrated (‘Left-Out Linda’ has some quite scrappy moments). ‘The Green People’, though, does indicate a story-paper that is really starting to become what it is best remembered for: a story with environmental themes (the main plot is of a community fighting against the building of a planned motorway) alongside science fictional elements (the eponymous Green People are human-looking aliens living a hidden life underground, determined to defend their seclusion with force if necessary).

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Rafart)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • The Green People (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Barracuda Bay (artist Santiago Hernandez)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)
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Jinty 3 May 1975

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Not a particularly distinguished cover in itself, and sadly without any references to the stories inside. However, it’s quite a neat illustration of the sorts of competitions that were a regular feature of girls’ comics of the time.

A short self-contained set of stories ran at around this time, illustrating the nursery rhyme about people born on certain days of the week – here, “Thursday’s Child” who has far to go. In this case, a polish evacuee to England returns to Poland after the war to search for her parents, and finds… a memorial to herself put up in 1939. Her parents come to the grave to put flowers on it every month, and they meet that way; in three pages, this is a real distillation of a classic type of comic story.

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Tricia’s Tragedy (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Bet Gets The Bird! (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Thursday’s Child
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)

Trini Tinturé

Spanish comic artist Trini is an iconic Jinty creator; her sharp lines lend themselves well to mean girls (Stacey in ‘The Slave of Form 3B’) and to humour (The Zodiac Prince). She has illustrated some true classics – ‘Creepy Crawley’ and ‘The Slave of Form 3B’ in particular – but whether drawing a one-shot Gypsy Rose story or a longer arc that gives her free rein with mad eyes and grins, her distinctive style is always a delight to see. She seems particularly good at brunettes with snapping glares, but her happy-go-lucky Zodiac Prince, one of the few male protagonists in a Jinty story, is also a memorable character.

Some of her stories are signed, such as this page from ‘Sisters At War!’ – a small neat signature in the very bottom left of the page that would be easy to miss. Even without that, it would be hard to avoid a contented recognition of her beautiful artwork on first sight.

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She is widely-published in Continental Europe, with long-running strips and short one-offs in Dutch comic Tina and in German magazine Biggi. Sadly though her name never became famous in this country in the way her artwork really deserves.

Her official website has text in English and Spanish.

List of Jinty stories attributable to Trini Tinturé:

Stories in other titles:

  • Orphans of Italy (June and School Friend, 1968) – 50 episodes
  • Jumping Julie and the Harlequins (Judy, 1969)
  • Oh, Tinker! (June and School Friend, 1969-1972)