Tag Archives: Debbie

Story Theme: Journey Story or Quest

The Journey Story or Quest was a popular story theme at certain points in Jinty and in other titles. Indeed, at some points in 1976, it would have been possible to be reading an issue of Jinty which included three or even arguably four journey stories in the same week’s comic (see 24 April 1976 for an example). It’s a story framework which allows the creators to vary the setting and characters as much as they like, and to experiment with a range of local touches if desired (Scottish kilts, Welsh mountains, or European stereotypes could be brought in depending on the story). Within a Quest theme the dramatic tension is kept up, too – the protagonist is always thinking of the thing that keeps them on the journey – the danger they are avoiding or the goal they are trying to reach.

The journey story is of course focused around a lengthy journey, but it is also something of a quest, as the protagonist has someone she needs to find or something she needs to do before she can stop journeying. She does not just head out for the fun of it or to see the sights; there is some motivating reason for her to keep moving. Apart from the journey element, the other themes of the story can be fairly varied: there are journey stories in Jinty which are rooted in science fiction, humour, love of aninals, and more.

Core examples

Song of the Fir Tree” (1975-76). This story has siblings Solveig and Per traveling across Europe after they are released from the concentration camp they were held in during WWII. They travel from Germany to Norway under their own steam, constantly having to keep one step ahead of their enemy Grendelsen (though at the same time, unknown to them, their father is chasing after them also).

This was the first journey story printed in Jinty. Clear precursors outside of British girls comics are “I Am David” and “The Silver Sword”, both of which feature long journeys and have child protagonists dealing with the aftermath of WWII.

Fran of the Floods” (1976). After her home town is overwhelmed in flooding, Fran Scott travels the length of an apocalyptic Britain to see if her sister is alive and well in Scotland. This popular and well-remembered journey story is one of survival against the odds and courage in the face of barbaric behaviour on the part of other survivors.

Bound for Botany Bay” (1976). Betsy Tanner is transported to Australia; in addition to the lengthy sea journey, once she gets to Botany Bay she runs off and travels across dangerous countryside, eventually finding her father who was sentenced to transportation earlier on.

For Peter’s Sake!” (1976). Set in the 1930s, Carrie Lomax has a brother who is seriously ill. Her grandmother’s pram has rocked many babies back to good health in a seemingly miraculous way and she hopes that it will do the same for little Peter. However, Carrie and the pram are in Scotland and the rest of her family is in London, and she needs to push the pram all the way back to him on foot.

The Darkening Journey” (1977). Thumper has been separated from his owner Julie, who is moving house with her family, across Britain to the west country. To add to the pathos, both of them are going slowly blind: Julie because she needs an operation to cure her, and Thumper because of an accident at the time they were separated. Together with his friend Beaky, a clever talking rook, he travels towards the setting sun to see if he can be reunited with his beloved owner.

Race For A Fortune” (1977-78). This is a humourous take on the journey story: Katie McNabb must race her snobby cousins in a journey to inherit her skinflint great-uncle Ebeneezer’s money. The one who reaches Ebeneezer’s home village of Yuckiemuckle first, starting out from the south of England with no money to help them, will win the race and the terms of the will. Katie and her cousins battle it out, each overtaking the other at various points on their travels.

“Somewhere Over The Rainbow” (1978-79). This is the longest, most epic of all the journey stories in Jinty (indeed so long is it, at 36 episodes, that to date I have quailed before the mighty task of writing a story post for it!). Dorothy and Max are an orphaned brother-sister pair who run away from the state care they are put into when their mother is killed. Inspired by the Wizard of Oz song, they travel from the south of England all the way to Scotland, hoping to find happiness at a care home called Rainbow’s End.

Edge cases and uncertainties

The core stories listed above all feature epic, dangerous, and long journeys as a central aspect of the story. There are other stories in Jinty which feature travelling on the part of the protagonists, but without it being such a central part of the plot.

Then There Were 3…” (1976). This is more of a mystery story: ten girls hire a narrowboat and travel on the water for some time, but the plot primarily focuses on the mystery of what is behind the occurrences that spook the girls. Is it something supernatural in origin, or is it down to a purely human villainy?

“The Big Cat” (1976-77) When her grandmother dies and she is evicted from the gypsy camp she lives in, Ruth travels with the big cat Ayesha that the story is named after. We do not currently have a story post about this to confirm if this is more of a journey story, or a fugitive story where the protagonist runs away and spends time in hiding rather than in travelling towards a clear goal.

Not to be confused with…

There are plenty of stories that include an element of journeying or travelling, such as those ones where the main character runs away: for instance Jinty‘s first issue includes the story “A Dream for Yvonne“, where Yvonne runs away from the circus to become a ballerina. She does not travel throughout the story unceasingly until she reaches her goal, though: she runs away multiple times, loses her memory, is threatened by jealous rivals, and is eventually accepted by both her family and the ballet school. The journeying is not the main point of the story, but rather her challenge lies in how to be accepted by family and friends.

Likewise in many stories there is a dramatic finale where the protagonist runs away either to elicit sympathy or to enact some specific deed: Gail in “Gail’s Indian Necklace” and Lee in “Daddy’s Darling” are two such examples from Jinty‘s early days. I am not counting these either, as the main focus of the story is again not on the journey itself, which is pretty limited in the span of story time that it takes up.

Fugitive stories may overlap considerably with the journey story, but again the key question in my mind is whether the fugitive keeps running, or mostly hides away somewhere. “Always Together…” (1974-75) has an orphaned family (well, almost – read the story summary for more detail) who run away from the welfare state mechanisms which are threatening to split them up. They do not keep running continuously, but instead camp out in a few locations and fend for themselves throughout the bulk of the story.

There are a few stories with castaways (“Desert Island Daisy“, “Girl The World Forgot“): if you are going to be cast away on a desert island you can hardly avoid having travelled, somewhere along the lines! But the focus is then on the predicament of the main character, not on a prolonged journey. The same goes for “Alice In A Strange Land” which has a transatlantic plane journey at beginning and end of the story, and a dramatic crash landing in an early episode, but which does not focus on those elements in the core plot.

Elsewhere…

Journey-themed stories were of course not confined to the pages of Jinty, though the April 1976 spike in popularity of these stories is perhaps only seen in this title. The following stories are not meant to be a complete list of journey stories, but just to give a flavour of the prevalence and the variety of them across both IPC and DC Thomson. (Many thanks to Mistyfan for providing scans of the below and other stories, and also to Lorrbot and the Girls Comics of Yesterday site, which I checked for mention of journey stories.)

  • Glen, A Dog on a Lonely Quest (Tammy, 1971)
  • Janet and her Travellin’ Javelin (Debbie, 1974)
  • Towne in the Country (Tammy, 1976-77)
  • The Ride-Away Randalls (Debbie, 1978)
  • The Wandering Starrs (Bunty, 1978-79)
  • One Girl and Her Dog (Tammy, 1978-79)
  • Jumbo and Jet (Tracy, 1981)
  • Jet’s Incredible Journey (Suzy, 1986)

Other thoughts

This post is already rather long, but I have more thoughts about the theme. Another post will follow, discussing aspects of how journey stories actually worked in more detail, looking at some of the stories mentioned above.

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Ana Rodriguez

One of the artists mentioned in the recent talk about girls comics was Ana Rodriguez. David Roach has a set of portfolio samples used to showcase her drawing abilities (see below) which credits her as such. Initially I had little luck in finding any internet trace of her but eventually I found an entry for her on Spain’s comic artist database, Tebeosfera, as Anita Rodriguez Ruiz . This also links to an entry on Lambiek’s Comiclopedia.

Ana Rodrigues art sample
Art from “Cindy of Swan Lake”, published in Tammy

Stories in Jinty:

Stories in Tammy:

  • Mandy and the House of Models (1973)
  • Trina Drop-Out (1973)
  • Last Song at Sunset (1974)
  • Cindy of Swan Lake (1979-80)

(The latter list is taken from Catawiki, with many thanks to that site.)

She also drew a large number of stories in DC Thomson titles such as Debbie, Judy, Tracy. See the Girls Comics of Yesterday site for posts tagged with her name.

Her particular focus is clearly on girls comics, though there is little solid information on the Tebeosfera and Comiclopedia sites about other work done by her. Here are some pages from “Blind Ballerina”, where Ana Rodriguez’s showcasing of the girl protagonist’s faces is very evident.

Ana Rodriguez 27 September 1975

Ana Rodriguez 27 September 1975
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Ana Rodriguez 27 September 1975
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Hugh Thornton-Jones

gayes-gloomy-ghost-1gayes-gloomy-ghost-2Sample Images

Hugh Thornton-Jones has been a long-serving artist in girls’ comics. His work spans all across the DCT titles Bunty, Mandy, Judy, Tracy and Debbie. An (incomplete) list of his stories there can be found here:

http://girlscomicsofyesterday.com/?s=hugh+thornton-jones

In regard to IPC, no information is currently available on what work Thornton-Jones did for June or School Friend. He drew “The Incredible Shrinking Girl” for the short-lived Princess (series 2). For Tammy, Thornton-Jones drew one serial “Claire’s Airs and Graces”, a few Strange Stories (“The Lollipop Man’s Promise”, reprinted as a Gypsy Rose story), but was seen most often as one of the Wee Sue artists. During Tammy’s credits period, Thornton-Jones was credited with just one story, “Postcards from the Past”. This sole credit is what establishes the name of what might otherwise be another unknown Jinty artist.

Thornton-Jones started on Jinty as a filler artist for “The Jinx from St Jonah’s” and “Champion in Hiding”, but it was not long before he drew his own stories for Jinty. These were “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!” and “Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost”. Both of them were humour strips that starred a fantasy character who created paranormal hijinks every week. They kept Thornton-Jones busy because they both ran for a long time; the former lasted three years and the latter two years, right up until the last issue of Jinty.

Thornton-Jones’s style was not quite as strong as some artists, such as Mario Capaldi. But it is a genial, pleasing style that can fit in with a lot of general stories (school, ponies, emotional). Thornton-Jones could draw period stories, such as The Guardian Tree (Mandy) and Catch the Cat! (Bunty), though his art was seen more often in contemporary settings. Thornton-Jones also had a flair for humour and caricature, especially for drawing people with long, thin, pointed noses. So his style was also used in more zany, offbeat stories, such “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!”, “Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost” and “Microgirl” (Tracy).

Stories Hugh Thornton-Jones drew for Jinty:

  • The Jinx from St. Jonah’s (filler artist)
  • Champion in Hiding (second artist)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost

Hugo D’Adderio

Sample Images

Call from the Heart 1Call from the Heart 2

Call from the Heart 3.jpeg

Hugo D’Adderio is one of Jinty’s oddest artists in that he never drew a single serial for her. His artwork appeared in the Gypsy Rose stories. Some of them were recycled Strange Stories (substituting Rose for the Storyteller), but others, such as “Call from the Heart” (above) were completely original.

D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Tammy and Misty, but he never drew a serial for them either. D’Adderio drew only one complete Misty story, “Song of Petina”. In the case of Tammy, he drew Strange Stories such as “Farah’s Three Wishes” and “The Samaritan”. There was one mini Storyteller serial that D’Adderio drew as well – this was “Sharon’s Shadow”. After the Storyteller disappeared from Tammy, D’Adderio’s artwork continued to appear in Tammy with complete stories, which were either recycled Strange Stories (replacing the Storyteller with text) or new stories, such as “The Moon Maiden” and “The Lady of Ranoch Water”. During 1982-1984, D’Adderio received credits for his new stories in Tammy, as this was the period when Tammy ran them. D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Debbie, where he did draw serials, including “To Tessa, a Sister” and “Hetty with the Healing Hand”.

D’Adderio’s artwork has a sumptuous, visceral style that has a baroque feel to it and even a dash of romance, which makes it best suited to period stories. In fact, just about every single D’Adderio story I have seen has a period theme. Themes have ranged from ancient Babylon to the 1950s, but most often they are set in the 16th-19th centuries. D’Adderio is also brilliant at drawing stories that have a nautical theme and his depiction of the sea itself is breathtaking. A sample is below.

d_adderio_verstekeling
De Verstekeling (The Stowaway) (from Dutch magazine Tina, 1986)

 

More information on Hugo D’Adderio can be found at https://www.lambiek.net/artists/d/d-adderio_hugo.htm

Hugo D’Adderio Gypsy Rose stories in Jinty

  • A Window on the Past
  • Wednesday’s Child
  • Farah’s Three Wishes (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • No Expectations
  • Kathie, Come Home! (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • Ancient Remedy
  • Call from the Heart
  • Message in a Bottle (Tammy & Jinty merger)
  • Dance of Death (Tammy & Jinty merger)