Tag Archives: Farah’s Three Wishes

Jinty and Penny 7 March 1981

Jinty cover 7 March 1981

  • Pam of Pond Hill (artist Bob Harvey, writer Jay Over)
  • The Ghost Dancer (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Farah’s Three Wishes (artist Hugo D’Adderio) – Gypsy Rose story
  • Just the Job – feature with Leo Sayers and Rod Stewart – first episode
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • No Medals for Marie (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Alison Christie)
  • Winning Ways 47 (writer Benita Brown)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Alley Cat (artist Rob Lee)

This week’s sports cover has Mario Capaldi drawing gymnastics, a sport we seldom see him depicting in girls’ comics. “Just the Job” replaces “Behind the Screen” this week, and its job is to inform us what’s behind the world of pop music. Alley Cat takes the spot as the humour cartoon this time. Snoopa must have been on holiday.

The Gypsy Rose story is another recycled Strange Story, and it’s a morality tale in “be careful what you wish for”. A genie grants Persian girl Farah three wishes – but warns her to think carefully before making a wish because he can only grant exactly what she asks for. This means granting her wishes literally, as Farah finds out when she blows her first two wishes because she jumped the gun and did not heed the genie’s warning. Will she think carefully about the third wish and make it the right one? Or will she end up wasting three perfectly good wishes – and maybe have an even deeper regret than that?

Ferne’s plan to help Jolie get over her dancing block is to dress up in her mother’s Firebird costume and pass herself off as “The Ghost Dancer”, which the girls all think is haunting the school. The plan does help Jolie’s dancing – but then blabbermouth Jolie tells everyone, so now the ghost rumour is worse than ever.

In “Land of No Tears”, the Gamma girls beat the odds and make it through the preliminary rounds in the Golden Girl award. Unfortunately there’s now a lot of heat on them, especially as the authorities are astonished to find no record of Cassy in their computer (well, there wouldn’t be as she’s an unwitting time traveller from the 20th century!). The dreaded Hive Inspector is being called in, and Perfecta is on the trail of the Gamma girls’ secret trainer.

Miss Simon – after a taste of what asthmatic Paul goes through – agrees to Marie’s request to let her have Simon Hall a year earlier because Paul is deteriorating so badly. Even so, it’s still nine months off. Will Paul last the distance?

Pam’s still stuck on the school magazine and Miss Peeble tries to help, but not very successfully. Miss Larks is definitely not under arrest, but she is on leave, and it’s linked to what Pam thinks is a blackmailer. She spots someone in Miss Larks’ apartment who could be the miscreant and gets the gang organised to catch him.

Sir Roger answers a “ghost for hire” ad. Sounds reminiscent of the old “Rent-a-ghost” strip from Buster. Tansy tries all sorts of nutty tactics to avoid “Dismal Dee” – but she’s the one who ends up dismal, because it cost her the chance of a concert ticket to see her current favourite pop group.

As well as having to fend off the cheating Syreeta and Selena, who are out to cheat her out of a disco contest (Syreeta) and netball match (Selena), Nadine now has to choose between the two events. For the first time she shows team spirit and chooses netball over disco. Stuffy Betty has had a change of heart too, and she wants to help Nadine against the two cheats.

Hugo D’Adderio

Sample Images

Call from the Heart 1Call from the Heart 2

Call from the Heart 3.jpeg

Hugo D’Adderio is one of Jinty’s oddest artists in that he never drew a single serial for her. His artwork appeared in the Gypsy Rose stories. Some of them were recycled Strange Stories (substituting Rose for the Storyteller), but others, such as “Call from the Heart” (above) were completely original.

D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Tammy and Misty, but he never drew a serial for them either. D’Adderio drew only one complete Misty story, “Song of Petina”. In the case of Tammy, he drew Strange Stories such as “Farah’s Three Wishes” and “The Samaritan”. There was one mini Storyteller serial that D’Adderio drew as well – this was “Sharon’s Shadow”. After the Storyteller disappeared from Tammy, D’Adderio’s artwork continued to appear in Tammy with complete stories, which were either recycled Strange Stories (replacing the Storyteller with text) or new stories, such as “The Moon Maiden” and “The Lady of Ranoch Water”. During 1982-1984, D’Adderio received credits for his new stories in Tammy, as this was the period when Tammy ran them. D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Debbie, where he did draw serials, including “To Tessa, a Sister” and “Hetty with the Healing Hand”.

D’Adderio’s artwork has a sumptuous, visceral style that has a baroque feel to it and even a dash of romance, which makes it best suited to period stories. In fact, just about every single D’Adderio story I have seen has a period theme. Themes have ranged from ancient Babylon to the 1950s, but most often they are set in the 16th-19th centuries. D’Adderio is also brilliant at drawing stories that have a nautical theme and his depiction of the sea itself is breathtaking. A sample is below.

d_adderio_verstekeling
De Verstekeling (The Stowaway) (from Dutch magazine Tina, 1986)

 

More information on Hugo D’Adderio can be found at https://www.lambiek.net/artists/d/d-adderio_hugo.htm

Hugo D’Adderio Gypsy Rose stories in Jinty

  • A Window on the Past
  • Wednesday’s Child
  • Farah’s Three Wishes (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • No Expectations
  • Kathie, Come Home! (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • Ancient Remedy
  • Call from the Heart
  • Message in a Bottle (Tammy & Jinty merger)
  • Dance of Death (Tammy & Jinty merger)