Tag Archives: Forget-me-not at Christmas

Guy Peeters

Sample Images

Worlds Apart 23aWorlds Apart 23bWorlds Apart 23cWorlds Apart 23d

Guy Peeters is a very popular, long-standing artist in girls’ comics. Regrettably, he has no entry at all at Lambiek Comiclopedia and no other information on him is currently available, except for a listing of his works on Catawiki. It is only due to the Tammy credits that his name is known, but it is possible that it was a pseudonym.

Peeters was a very prolific artist at DCT, with his artwork appearing in Nikki, Mandy, Judy and M&J among others. His best-known work at DCT is arguably Penny’s Place, which started in M&J and then moved to Bunty with a merger. An incomplete list of Peeters stories at DCT can be found here.

At IPC, Peeters made his strongest presence in Jinty, particularly in regard to her SF stories. SF was one of his strengths, and his style really brought several of Jinty’s SF classics to life, including “Land of No Tears” and “Worlds Apart”. Peeters also brought off sport well, but only did one sports story for Jinty, “Black Sheep of the Bartons”. It is rather surprising that he also drew a ballet story, “Slave of the Swan”, and also a complete story, “Forget-Me-Not at Christmas”, which contained period elements, as his style is less suited to ballet and period stories than other artists.

In Tammy, Peeters’ artwork appeared more intermittently. He drew nothing for Misty, despite his aptitude for SF. But he did draw one of Tammy’s best-remembered SF classics, “E.T. Estate”. This was during Tammy’s credit run, which gives a name to this hugely popular artist.

Guy Peeters Jinty stories

  • Carnival of Flowers – Gypsy Rose story (1977)
  • Land of No Tears (1977-78)
  • Slave of the Swan (1978)
  • The Human Zoo (1978-79)
  • “I’ll Make Up for Mary” (1979)
  • Pandora’s Box (1979)
  • Black Sheep of the Bartons (1979)
  • Forget-Me-Not at Christmas – complete story (1979)
  • Worlds Apart (1981)

 

Credited Guy Peeters story in Tammy (click thru)

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Jinty Annual 1984

Jinty annual 1984

  • The Talking Cat (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Wet Day Fun (feature)
  • Forget-Me-Not at Christmas (artist Guy Peeters)
  • Could You be Top of the Form? (quiz)
  • The Four-Footed Friends (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • The Dog with No Name (text story)
  • Snoopa (artist Joe Collins)
  • Flower Power (feature)
  • Your Star Qualities (feature)
  • It’s Sausage Time (feature)
  • Capitals of the World (feature)
  • Pet Quiz
  • Fun with Foil (feature)
  • The House across the Way
  • Write On! (feature)
  • Let’s Make Mobiles! (feature)
  • Get Stripy Knitting Pattern (feature)
  • Alley Cat
  • Are You a Good Sport? (quiz)
  • Is It True? (feature)
  • Back to School (feature)
  • Water Safety (feature)
  • The Enchanted Place (text story)
  • Sweet ‘n’ Simple (feature)
  • Children in Other Countries (feature)
  • The Maze Craze (puzzles)
  • Are You a Real Friend? (quiz)
  • Paint a Puppet (feature)
  • Princess Punkerella (artist Jaume Rumeu aka Homero Romeu)
  • Don’t Tell Stories, Brian (text story)
  • The School Journey (game)

Jinty annual 1984 was the last Jinty annual to have any recognisable Jinty material. The next two would be a collection of reprints that were taken from older annuals and were Jinty in name only. Stories that are recognisably Jinty are Alley Cat, Snoopa, and reprints of The Four-Footed Friends and Forget-Me-Not at Christmas. But there is no trace anywhere of Gypsy Rose or Pam of Pond Hill. What appear to be new material are “The Talking Cat”, “Princess Punkerella” and the text stories. And the annual is heavy on features, such as recipes, art & craft, quizzes, general knowledge and games.

We get some Misty in this annual. “The House Across the Way” is a surprise in that it is a reprint from Misty #16. “Princess Punkerella” could be straight out of Misty too, as it is drawn by Honiera Romeu, who was a regular Misty artist. The story is worthy of Misty too, as it concerns a punk girl, Ella Jones, who tries to extort money out of an old lady. The old lady says that her purse has nothing but three wishes. Ella uses the first two wishes to satisfy her greed, but as you might expect, it backfires and Ella’s third wish is to wish she had never met the old woman. Yet this story never appeared in Misty. Neither did “The Talking Cat”, which could be straight out of Misty as well. Shona finds her beloved cat Clovis, who has been taken ill, can suddenly talk. The reason is that he is possessed by an alien, and it’s not long before all the cats in the neighbourhood are talking too! It all turns out to be a dream, but of course Clovis recovers.

While this can be described as the last substantial Jinty annual, it is a bit disappointing that it does not use more Jinty material, even just more reprints. Some of the shorter Jinty stories, such as Tale of the Panto Cat, could have been recycled, and likewise with Gypsy Rose tales. Why did Jinty not use more of her own material – legal reasons, maybe? Or economics? Still, this annual would still satisfy any reader who wants a good read from cover to cover.

Jinty 29 December 1979

Jinty cover 12.jpg

  • Pam of Pond Hill (artist Bob Harvey, writer Jay Over)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Spirit of the Lake (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Tale of the Panto Cat – last episode (unknown artist Merry)
  • Toni on Trial (artist Terry Aspin)
  • Rinty ‘n’ Jinty
  • White Water (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Forget-me-not at Christmas – complete story (artist Guy Peeters)
  • When Statues Walk… (artist Phil Gascoine)

It is Jinty‘s Christmas issue for 1979 and Jinty makes it a big celebration. Even the stories that do not feature Christmas still celebrate it with snow-covered logos and/or holly. There is a nice touch of humour on the cover with the cat playing with the tinsel garland. That is just the sort of thing a cat might play with.

The Christmas issue starts off with a quiz “Make it your wishbone Christmas”. In fact, the quiz is the first thing you see when you open the cover. The break from a picture story starting things off sure makes it clear how serious Jinty is about celebrating Christmas. Her 1979 Christmas story, “Tale of the Panto Cat” concludes with this issue, of course. Everything ends happily of course – except for our would-be-grinch Verna, who spends her Christmas in quarantine when her last trick to spoil the Christmas panto backfires.

Despite the happy ending and the efforts of one girl in “Panto Cat” to remember the Christmas spirit, even with Verna, there is not much Christmas message in the story. That is reserved for “Forget-me-not at Christmas”, a very poignant story of a Victorian waif who was invited to a rich girl’s party but was turned away because they forgot she was invited. She sat outside in the snow waiting to be remembered. But by the time they did, poor Forget-me-not had frozen to death! In the 20th century, Sandie Hurst encounters the ghost of Forget-me-not and invites her to their Christmas party. Will Forget-me-not be remembered this time?

Alley Cat tries to raise money for Christmas from carol singing, but thrown boots and smashed windows tell you how good he is at carol singing. But in the end he does get a happy Christmas because he unwittingly did the Muchloots a favour.