Tag Archives: Gertie Grit the Hateful Brit!

Jinty and Lindy 1 January 1977

Jinty cover 1 January 1977

Contents in this issue:

Jinty’s New Year issue for 1977 was bang on New Year’s Day. Jinty says “make it a great New Year – with us!” Indeed, in my opinion 1977 was the year Jinty hit her stride. In 1977 she cast off the Lindy logo that had stayed with her throughout 1976. But what really defined 1977 as the year Jinty hit her stride was fully establishing her trademark science fiction and jauntiness with strips like the quirky “Fran’ll Fix It!” and her “smash hit” story of 1977, “Land of No Tears”. In the same year, Jinty added her resident spooky storyteller, Gypsy Rose. It was also in 1977 that Jinty added Guy Peeters and the unknown Concrete Surfer to her team, who would go on to draw some of her biggest classics.

Oddly, although Gypsy Rose did not appear in Jinty until 29 January 1977, there is a horoscope in this issue saying, “Gypsy Rose looks at the stars”. Readers must have been wondering, “Who the heck is Gypsy Rose?” The horoscope appears on the same page as the blurb for a new story, “Mark of the Witch!”, so perhaps it was meant as a foreshadowing for Gypsy Rose too. If so, it is an odd one, because it gives no hint of who Gypsy Rose is supposed to be. Is it the pen name of the astrologer who writes the horoscope or something?

The cover itself is a beautiful one, with its ingenious use of blues, yellows and reds. The white space lightens things up and does not make the cover too heavy. The seasons look a bit mixed. Mandy’s water-skiing panel hints at summer, while the holly the poor old druid is about to sit on implies winter. The rock Gertie puts the holly on makes it reminiscent of a Christmas pudding, which further adds to the winter theme. While Mandy and Gertie look happy on the cover, we get the opposite with Ruth and Ayesha, who are on the wrong end of a farmer’s gun.

Of course we have New Year features. There is a page where pop stars like Paul McCartney and Paul Nicholas list their resolutions for 1977. In “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!” Henrietta mishears the word “resolution” as “revolution” and enchants everyone at school into a revolution instead of making resolutions. Alley Cat starts off New Year doing what he does best – annoying the Muchloots. In this case it’s raiding their larder for a New Year feast. Gertie triggers a series of events that establishes Stonehenge – its purpose being a tourist attraction – and its opening has New Year celebrations included.

Now, on to the other stories:

“Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud” is the first of Jinty’s stories to end in 1977, with the mixed-up identities of the skivvy and the high-class girl being sorted out once they finally find each other. This also marks the end of Jinty’s serials with 19th century settings, which had been introduced when Lindy merged into Jinty way back in November 1975. Its replacement next week is Phil Townsend’s first 1977 story, “Mark of the Witch!

So far there is no end for Hetty King’s ordeal. Hetty is lumbered with looking after Jo, but Jo hates Hetty because she wrongly blames Hetty for her sister’s death. Hetty manages to secure a job as a temporary PE teacher at her new locality after Jo’s hatred forced her out of her old one, but she faces an uphill battle to win respect from the pupils. And how long before Jo’s hatred interferes with everything?

Mandy applies makeup to adopt a new persona, “Bubbles”, and goes water-skiing. But really – wearing a wig while water-skiing? No wonder the episode ends with Mandy’s secret in danger.

Martine’s odd behaviour is getting worse and worse. Tessa can’t figure out what the hell is going on, except that Martine seems to be acting like the crazed woman she plays onstage.

As already mentioned on the cover, Ruth and Ayesha have a scary moment with a farmer. Fortunately he turns friendly after Ayesha saves his life. But then a shoplifter makes Ruth the scapegoat for her crimes, taking advantage of the prejudice against gypsies.

In “Is This Your Story?”, Lynn Carter feels her family don’t appreciate her and she envies her friend Mary for being an only child. But when both girls end up in hospital, right next to each other, Lynn learns that some people may not be as enviable as she thinks and she draws closer to her family.

In “Sceptre of the Toltecs”, both Clare and a class bully begin to suspect that Malincha, the mystery girl from Mexico, has strange powers. The blurb for next week says there will be more evidence of this.

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Jinty & Lindy 15 January 1977

jinty-lindy-cover-15-january-1977

Stories in this issue

 

I have just acquired this issue. The pages are loose, so it is possible something is missing in the middle, though I see nothing noticeably missing in the issue. If anyone sees anything missing in the list above, please let me know.

In “Go On, Hate Me!”, Hetty gets Jo out of two big scrapes, but the little hatemonger does not appreciate it one bit. She still hates Hetty as much as ever and now she’s turned other girls against her. However, we are told that all the hatred is going to bring an act of love next week. It sounds the end of the story then, and things are finally going to change for Hetty, thank goodness.

“Is This YOUR Story?” changes its title to “Could This Be YOU?” for some reason. The story is about a girl who is picked on because she is tall. When the teasing finally gets too much for her, a teacher comes up with a clever plan to help her use her height to her advantage and beat the bullies.

“Made-Up Mandy” also comes up with a plan to beat the bullies at her old school, who have bullied a friend out of the lead in the school play. She plays “ghost” to teach the bullies a lesson – but now she is in danger of being found out.

However, there is no respite from the bullying for poor Emma in “Mark of the Witch!”, despite Alice’s help to get her accepted at the riding club. No matter what she does, Emma is always “Black Emma” the bad lot in the eyes of the other kids.

There are no bullies in this week’s episode of “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!”. However, there is a vain girl in serious need of a lesson, and Henrietta is always ready to oblige.

“The Big Cat” is in big trouble – she got trapped in a warehouse that was being demolished. Ruth manages to get her out, but she’s injured.

“The Mystery of “Martine” is deepening, with Martine’s inexplicable behaviour growing even more troubling for her sister Tessa.

In “Sceptre of the Toltecs”, Malincha is giving guarded explanations for why her evil uncle is after her; she says she can’t reveal everything without consulting her father. That’s a bit annoying, especially as it looks like the evil uncle has now arrived.

Gertie Grit lands in the future this week instead of a period in Earth’s history. She helps out a dog that doesn’t want to be part of a space programme.

 

 

Jinty & Lindy 30 October 1976

Jinty 30 Oct 1976

Stories in this issue:

  • Jassy’s Wand of Power (artist Keith Robson)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Stefa’s Heart of Stone (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Rose among the Thornes (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Champion in Hiding (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Alley Cat
  • Sisters at War! (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Girl in a Bubble (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Pat Mills)
  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones) – last episode
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (artist Ken Houghton)

“Jassy’s Wand of Power” is the lead story on this issue; it takes up the front cover and runs to three and a half pages, oddly enough – but then there are only 3 panels on this front cover so I guess that means it is the equivalent of about three ordinary pages. It’s nice having a page of comics on the cover, really draws you in. In this episode, Jassy is starting to raise people’s awareness of the dangerous industrial process that Sir Harmer Jeffreys has been using. They still have to manage to get further away from him without either getting caught – and at the end of the episode they have to face a hungry and thirsty lion too!

Stefa is continuing in the grip of her grief – she is cooking her own food as her dad has forbidden her mother to cook for her until she comes to her senses. There is nearly a deadly chip pan fire as a result, and it is Stefa’s classmate who saves her. No gratitude results of course as this is the classmate who has an eerie likeness to Stefa’s dead friend.

Hugh Thornton-Jones has two stories in this issue – he has taken on the art duties for “Champion in Hiding” from Mario Capaldi, and he has also drawn the last episode that Katie Jinks appears in. In this story, Katie is chasing a wee black kitten that you’d think woud be a lucky cat – but who brings disaster to all whose path she crosses! Of course in the end the little kitten is given to Katie, who is very happy to have a kitten jinx in her life.

“Girl In A Bubble” has the sinster Miss Vaal finding her experimental subject Helen out of the bubble – but escape is not possible as Helen’s friend Linda is threatened by Miss Vaal unless she returns meekly to the bubble. Of course Linda goes and tells someone in charge, but Miss Vaal has a plan to deal with that without letting Helen escape again…

Jinty & Lindy 22 January 1977

Jinty 77

One of the most colourful and striking Jinty covers in my opinion, and it’s another of my favourites. On the cover, Henrietta is making it plain to Sue that she does not like Sue putting an umbrella into her while Emma stops a runaway horse but gets no thanks. As far as the villagers are concerned, she is a “bad ‘un” and that’s that. Only Alice is friendly and in this issue she offers her hand of friendship again. Will Emma take it next week?

Two stories end in this issue. Hetty reaches breaking point and snaps from all the hatred she is receiving. But Jo sees the consequences of the hatred against Hetty that she fermented and learns the value of forgiveness – not to mention getting her facts straight. Druid Caractacus finally catches up with Gertie, but she is pleased to see him because she is in a spot of bother. Next week we will see the start of one of Jinty’s most enduring and popular features – “Gypsy Rose’s Tales of Mystery and Magic“. Also starting next issue is “Freda, False Friend”, Phil Gascoine’s first Jinty story for 1977.

The origin of the Sceptre of the Toltecs is revealed, so the story is heading for its climax now. Made-Up Mandy has played “ghost” to help a friend, but narrowly missed being caught. And now she’s set on going on safari, although her nasty employer Miss Agate won’t allow it. So we have a pretty good suspicion that Mandy will be headed back to the make-up kit for another disguise next week. Whatever has possessed Martine is still causing trouble and  it’s all Tessa can do to concentrate on ballet so she can get into the City Ballet Company.

 

 

Jinty and Lindy 8 January 1977

Jinty and Lindy 8 January 1977

The striking aspect of this issue has got to be the cover artwork from “Mark of the Witch!“, which begins this week. This story shows emotional abuse happening generation after generation, though the abuse is not purely limited to being within the family: it’s perpetuated by the protagonist’s grim, tough father but also indulged in by the whole village. There is a telling panel where she avoids the father with palpable relief on her face – treading on eggshells, indeed.

Stories in this issue:

  • Go On, Hate Me! (artist Keith Robson, writer Len Wenn)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Sceptre of the Toltecs (artist Emilia Prieto)
  • Made-Up Mandy (artist Audrey Fawley)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh-Thornton Jones)
  • The Big Cat (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • The Mystery of Martine (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Alley Cat
  • Is This Your Story?
  • Mark of the Witch! (artist Phil Townsend)

Jinty and Lindy 25 December 1976

Jinty and Lindy 25 December 1976

Short or even complete stories did feature in Jinty every so often: Mistyfan has noted previously that this tended to happen around Christmas and New Year, presumably to fill in gaps and give a seasonal feel. The first story in this issue is a creepy one but, unusually, is not associated with a spooky story-teller: in “Holly anad the Ivy”, prickly protagonist Holly moves into an ivy-covered cottage and finds that the plant has a will of its own.

I am a bit puzzled about the artist on “Sceptre of the Toltecs”. The attribution that I have received on this story is that the artist is the Spaniard Cándido Ruiz Pueyo, and indeed looking at his entry on the Lambiek Comiclopedia this seems very plausible.

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Sceptre of the Toltecs pg 1 signature

The signature on the strip itself, though, clearly says ‘Prieto’, which is a reasonably common surname in Spanish (though on a quick google seems more associated with Mexico than with Spain itself). The handwriting on the signature closely matches Pueyo’s signature, as does small details like the way the shoes are drawn, so I am satisfied this is almost certainly the same person using a pseudonym. But why? (Or of course, why not?)

Update: David Roach has confirmed that this artist is Emilia Prieto – substantiated by a portfolio sample from the time.

It must be said there are greater questions about “Sceptre of the Toltecs” than the attribution of the artist. This is another case where the research underlying this story are what you might call minimal! The mysterious girl from Mexico is called ‘Malincha’ which she claims is a common name ‘where she comes from’ – but in fact any reader who has a connection to Mexico will think of ‘La Malinche‘, which will give more of the impression of treachery and colonialism than anything else.

Stories in this issue:

  • Holly and the Ivy (complete story: artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Sceptre of the Toltecs (artist Cándido Ruiz Pueyo Emilia Prieto)
  • Made-Up Mandy (artist Audrey Fawley)
  • The Big Cat (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Alley Cat
  • The Mystery of Martine (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Go On, Hate Me! (artist Keith Robson)
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (artist Ken Houghton)

Jinty & Lindy 11 December 1976

Jinty 11 December 1976

  • Go On, Hate Me! (artist Keith Robson)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Stefa’s Heart of Stone – final episode (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Made-Up Mandy (artist Audrey Fawley)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh-Thornton Jones)
  • The Big Cat (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Girl in a Bubble – final episode (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Pat Mills)
  • Alley Cat
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (Ken Houghton)

Strangely, in the previous issue, “Go On, Hate Me!” had started on the front cover. But here it starts on the next page in favour of a three-panel cover. Yet “Go On, Hate Me!” still gets a feature panel on the cover. Inside, Hetty Blake does win the race in the most determined, heroic manner you can imagine despite the tricks Jo plays on her. But her victory is greeted with stony silence by the girls who wrongly blame her for Carol’s death. Afterwards, Hetty is shattered to discover that Jo is one of them too. And the blurb for next week tells us the campaign against Hetty will intensify. No doubt Jo will be playing a hand there.

After weeks of nothing that sems to get through to Stefa about how silly she is about turning her heart to stone, she finally learns her lesson when, ironically, she gets what she wants! An accident turns her into a robot, incapable of feeling emotion. Stefa finally understands what it really means to have a heart of stone. But the solution to everything comes when a bolt of lightning destroys Stefa’s statue and teaches her that stone is not as indestructible as she thinks. Hmm, hand of God here?

“Girl in a Bubble” ends too – in near murder when Miss Vaal tries to suffocate Helen in the bubble by turning off the air supply. And it is the end of the bubble itself, which is left deflated and ripped where Helen broke out of it with her knife.

Gertie meets Attila the Hun – and it is thanks to her that he is the Attila the Hun of history. Before she showed up, he was a bit of a hippie, with flowers in his hair, and into peace and learning the gentle arts of civilization. By the time Gertie is off again, Attila is back to war – much to the delight of his people.

This week’s episode of “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag” is one that readers are bound to love – teaching a bully teacher a lesson! The teacher snatches Henrietta from Sue without a by-your-leave and dumps chalk in her to carry to class. You are asking for it there, Miss! Sue knows all too well that putting anything in Henrietta is asking for trouble, especially if it is something she does not like. Of course, the bully teacher’s punishment is inflicted by the chalk once Henrietta gets to work on it.

Daisy’s family send their reply to Maud about  the letter she sent explaining the mixup with Daisy. Maud is surprised to see their reply is a bird. What on earth is the point of that? Ah, that is something we will have to find out next issue. Meanwhile, Daisy completes her dangerous escape from the cruel mansion in one piece, but is now a fugitive. The search for her will surely start soon. Can she get help before that happens?

In “The Big Cat”, Ruth and Ayesha become targets of a search too. They escape the circus but soon discover the cruel circus owner has alerted the authorities about the ‘dangerous cheetah’.

Mandy’s talent for makeup continues to manifest when she re-does the makeup for Elizabeth the birthday girl. Both of them discover new-found confidence. And something has started now that plain Mandy has discovered she can be a glamour girl when she puts on makeup herself.

Jinty & Lindy 23 October 1976

Jinty Cover 23 October 1976 

  • Jassy’s Wand of Power (artist Keith Robson)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Is This Your Story?
  • Stefa’s Heart of Stone (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Rose among the Thornes (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Champion in Hiding (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Sisters at War! (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Girl in a Bubble (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Pat Mills)
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (artist Ken Houghton)

Human sacrifice on a Jinty cover is disturbing, even though we can see Jassy is striving to save the boy (and succeeds). The boy is blind, which makes it even more horrifying. It makes for a striking cover to feature on this blog. “Jassy’s Wand of Power” would have been better to keep the explanation that it is set in an alternate Britain that is more superstitious so readers who joined the story would know. But it didn’t, so some readers must have been been puzzled as to why Britain is suddenly reverting to human sacrifice, witchcraft and water diviners, even if it is in a drought crisis.

Witchcraft also features in Gertie Grit, where Gertie gets a job with a witch. She ends up causing the Vesuvius eruption and the destruction of Pompeii when she makes a miscalculation with some magic powder. Gertie is forced to make another hasty exit to another time period, and for once she learns a lesson: “You can’t learn magic spells in five minutes!”

This week’s “Is This Your Story?” features Clare who makes herself the centre of attention and the envy of her classmates with her clothes. They don’t realise the clothes are not Clare’s – she helps herself to her sisters’ wardrobes to impress everyone with her appearance. The sisters resort to drastic measures to teach Clare a lesson – they lock up their wardrobes and Clare’s, so the hitherto smartly dressed Clare has to go to school in her mum’s dress! Everyone gets a huge laugh, but Clare takes it in part and sees the funny side too. This is what sees her through her dressing down, so to speak, as well as learning her lesson.

Last week Stefa softened and cried when her mother had a bad accident. But then she regretted it, seeing it as weakness when she should have stayed firm with her stony heart. This week, silly Stefa resolves to harden up even more. So poor Mum is in for a shock when she comes home from the hospital. Dad reaches his limit and decides to give Stefa a taste of her own medicine by telling her she must buy and cook her own food. Stefa welcomes it, as it will widen the rift between them. But in the next issue, Stefa finds it turning into another test for her stony heart as she is a lousy cook! But will this teach her the lesson she so badly needs to learn?

Rose foils another plot from the Thornes, but falls out with her friend Elaine. The girl in the bubble is on the run from Miss Vaal, but she and Linda dodge the police to sneak back and find out what exactly Miss Vaal is up to. They find Miss Vaal’s black book, but what will it reveal? Daisy’s plan to escape by chimney  has to be put on hold when the family go on holiday and take the servants with them. It’s no holiday for Daisy, who still has to cope with hard work and bullying, but she is hopeful for a chance to escape her servitude on holiday. Will she succeed or be forced to go back to her chimney plan? Uncle Jason is in hospital, but this brings no peace between the Sisters at War. In Champion in Hiding, Mitzi’s mother is in hospital too, and nasty Aunt Shirley is taking advantage of it to sabotage Mitzi’s training for the dog championship.

 

Jinty and Lindy 20 November 1976

Image

  • Go On, Hate Me! – first episode (artist Keith Robson)
  • Gertie Grit the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Stefa’s Heart of Stone (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Rose among the Thornes (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! – first episode (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • The Big Cat – first episode (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Girl in a Bubble (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Pat Mills)
  • Is This Your Story? (artist John Richardson)
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Alley Cat

This issue marks the debut of one of Jinty‘s most popular humour strips, “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!” This strip would run for three years, arguably longer than The Jinx from St Jonah’s and Dora Dogsbody. Sue sees a handbag (brought back from the mysterious Orient) at a jumble sale and just has to have it. It seems that the handbag, which Sue names Henrietta, seems to be grinning at Sue, but Sue has no inkling of what she has bought just yet. But we do when a thief snatches the bag with the takings. He takes a comb out of the bag and when he uses it, he is astonished to find his hair growing to monstrous proportions and then wrapping around a pole. He ends up begging a policeman to arrest him. Sue takes back her bag, not noticing its mischievous grin. An interesting approach to the first episode, where we’re not told everything at once, but we have been given enough to have us eager for the next episode.

Two other stories start, “Go On, Hate Me!” and “The Big Cat”. The panel of happy running girls on the cover is a stark contrast to its title “Go On, Hate Me!” and belies the ugly campaign of hate that will start against Hetty Blake in subsequent episodes. Ruth Lee in “The Big Cat” is the target of a campaign as well, one that sees the council evict her gypsy camp. Ruth burns her caravan gypsy-style and sets out on a journey. Readers will see how it explains her dying gran’s prophecy: “Take care of the big cat and she’ll bring you luck and happiness at last.” What big cat? We get a hint that we will find out in the next episode when we read the blurb for it: “‘That’s Ayesha…and she’s untameable! A killer!'”

“Rose among the Thornes” is reaching its climax, with an unexpected twist that could backfire on the Thornes. A canister fell from a plane and wrecked gran’s cottage, which gives them the excuse to pull it down. But they don’t realise the canister contains a dangerous toxic chemical and it is leaking! Rose is on her way to warn them, and it is the race of her life.

Stefa gets even more daft with her heart of stone. Dad threatens to get rid of her statue, so Stefa runs away – with the statue on a wheelbarrow! You just have to laugh, and of course Stefa can’t get far when she is carrying a statue along.

Jinty & Lindy 4 December 1976

Image

(Cover artist: Keith Robson)

  • Go on, Hate Me! (artist Keith Robson)
  • Gertie Grit, the Hateful Brit! (artist Paul White)
  • Stefa’s Heart of Stone (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Made-Up Mandy. First episode. (artist Audrey Fawley)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • The Big Cat (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Girl in a Bubble (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Pat Mills)
  • Is This Your Story?
  • Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud (artist Ken Houghton)

We have returned to covers that feature the first page of a story after a jag on 1-2 story panel covers. With Katie Jinx gone, the cover is currently occupied by one of Jinty’s most disturbing and ugliest stories, “Go on, Hate Me!” You may find yourself wincing when you view this cover. Hettie King is hated because her sports club blames her (wrongly, of course) for the death of her friend, Carol, on the field. Nobody listens to Hettie’s protests of innocence. Among them is Carol’s sister Jo, who is secretly Hettie’s worst enemy. In this episode Jo puts tacks in Hettie’s shoes, which draws blood (ugh – poor Hettie!). But Hettie is determined to run because it was Carol’s dying wish that the club win the relay. In the next episode she does win the relay despite her damaged feet, but gets no thanks for it. By the way, is it my imagination, or has Hettie’s head been drawn too large in the opening panel?

In “Stefa’s Heart of Stone”, Stefa discovers that Ruth is far braver than she is – having lost three people while Stefa has lost one. But Stefa has still not learned her lesson and remains even more determined to turn her heart to stone so she will not face grief again. What will get through to the wretched girl?

In this issue, “Made-Up Mandy” starts. In a variant of the Cinderella theme, Mandy Mason is a cleaner and caretaker at a beauty salon where everyone looks down on her and her employer, Miss Agate, is nasty. But then Mandy discovers that she has a talent for make-up herself, and her talent enables her to secretly enter a variety of disguises that improves her self-confidence but also gets her into a lot of scrapes. And it all has to be kept secret from Miss Agate, who will surely sack Mandy.

It is the penultimate episode of “Girl in a Bubble”, and now poor Helen is back in the bubble at Miss Vaal’s. Nobody listened to Helen’s protests that she did not need it or that Miss Vaal is insane. Belatedly, Helen’s parents wake up, and now they are speeding towards her. But are they too late? Miss Vaal has put in extra security to stop Helen escaping again, and in the last episode she will well and truly show just how insane she is.

In “Daisy Drudge and Milady Maud” we see another bid to escape. Daisy, a rich snobby girl who has been mistaken for a skivvy,  is so desperate to escape the skivvy’s life that she is climbing a chimney to do it.