Tag Archives: No Expectations

Jinty & Penny 14 March 1981

jinty-cover-14-march-1981

  • Pam of Pond Hill (artist Bob Harvey, writer Jay Over)
  • The Ghost Dancer (artist Phil Townsend)
  • No Expectations – Gypsy Rose story (artist Hugo D’Adderio)
  • Snoopa (artist Joe Collins)
  • Just the Job
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • No Medals for Marie – (artist Phil Gascoine, writer Alison Christie Fitt)
  • Winning Ways 48 (writer Benita Brown)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine – (artist Mario Capaldi)

Pam thinks Miss Larks is being blackmailed, which leads to an embarrassing moment when Fred and Terry jump what they think is the blackmailer by mistake. Oh well, they were just trying to be helpful. The ‘blackmailer’ is Miss Larks’ nephew Steve Arnott, who takes over the reins for the upcoming school magazine Pam is struggling over.

“The Ghost Dancer” is approaching crunch time. Ferne wants to end her deception but is too scared of the consequences. But fate takes a hand when Ferne finds out that Jolie is in danger from a cracked pillar. Everyone sees the supposedly wheelchair-bound Ferne suddenly running off to try to avert disaster.

“No Medals for Marie” enters its penultimate episode. That mean old Miss Simon won’t let Marie’s family have the country home they so desperately need for Paul’s health. She’s going to abandon Paul to slowly die of asthma in his polluted town although she knows how serious his condition is. And it’s just because she’s so jealous at Marie finally winning a medal.

“Life’s a Ball for Nadine” is also on its penultimate episode. There are two jealous sisters going up against Nadine at netball and disco and trying to cheat her out of both. Nadine beats one sister at netball in this episode, but now she has to beat the other at disco in the final episode.

The Gamma Girls have won the preliminary rounds at the Golden Girl trophy, but it’s not all victory. Perfecta is on the trail of their secret trainer, who is Miranda’s mother. Cassy manages to foil Perfecta this time, but she is still suspicious. Plus, the dreaded Hive Inspector is going to pay a visit. He has the power to take Miranda and her mother away if he discovers their secret, and they will never return.

This week Gypsy Rose brings us an original story instead of a recycled Strange Story. Dora Lambert faithfully goes to Miss Harleigh to read Charles Dickens to her. Despite the Dickens title she reads from in the story, Dora expects and asks for nothing, even though her poor family could do with it. However, Gypsy Rose has forewarned us that there could be a surprise in store.

Sir Roger accidentally creates a double of himself, and then it’s triplets. Gaye ends up with treble the trouble of feeding a gluttonous ghost.

Tansy’s got a detective kit. She’s on the case of the missing hockey cup, which has disappeared from her bedroom window. For once pesky brother Simon and practical joker Peter are in the clear, so who could have done it?

Hugo D’Adderio

Sample Images

Call from the Heart 1Call from the Heart 2

Call from the Heart 3.jpeg

Hugo D’Adderio is one of Jinty’s oddest artists in that he never drew a single serial for her. His artwork appeared in the Gypsy Rose stories. Some of them were recycled Strange Stories (substituting Rose for the Storyteller), but others, such as “Call from the Heart” (above) were completely original.

D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Tammy and Misty, but he never drew a serial for them either. D’Adderio drew only one complete Misty story, “Song of Petina”. In the case of Tammy, he drew Strange Stories such as “Farah’s Three Wishes” and “The Samaritan”. There was one mini Storyteller serial that D’Adderio drew as well – this was “Sharon’s Shadow”. After the Storyteller disappeared from Tammy, D’Adderio’s artwork continued to appear in Tammy with complete stories, which were either recycled Strange Stories (replacing the Storyteller with text) or new stories, such as “The Moon Maiden” and “The Lady of Ranoch Water”. During 1982-1984, D’Adderio received credits for his new stories in Tammy, as this was the period when Tammy ran them. D’Adderio’s artwork also appeared in Debbie, where he did draw serials, including “To Tessa, a Sister” and “Hetty with the Healing Hand”.

D’Adderio’s artwork has a sumptuous, visceral style that has a baroque feel to it and even a dash of romance, which makes it best suited to period stories. In fact, just about every single D’Adderio story I have seen has a period theme. Themes have ranged from ancient Babylon to the 1950s, but most often they are set in the 16th-19th centuries. D’Adderio is also brilliant at drawing stories that have a nautical theme and his depiction of the sea itself is breathtaking. A sample is below.

d_adderio_verstekeling
De Verstekeling (The Stowaway) (from Dutch magazine Tina, 1986)

 

More information on Hugo D’Adderio can be found at https://www.lambiek.net/artists/d/d-adderio_hugo.htm

Hugo D’Adderio Gypsy Rose stories in Jinty

  • A Window on the Past
  • Wednesday’s Child
  • Farah’s Three Wishes (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • No Expectations
  • Kathie, Come Home! (recycled from Strange Stories)
  • Ancient Remedy
  • Call from the Heart
  • Message in a Bottle (Tammy & Jinty merger)
  • Dance of Death (Tammy & Jinty merger)

Hugo D’Adderio Strange Stories in Tammy

Farah’s Three Wishes 5/3/77

The Caliph’s Jewels 11/6/77

Eye of the Beholder 24/9/77

The Lady Celestine 10/12/77

The Master of the Birds 14/1/78

Veronica’s Visions 25/2/78

The Samaritan 20/5/78

The Witch Wind 10/6/78

Purse of Gold 26/8/78

Last Voyage 23/9/78

Voyage in Time 17/11/79