Tag Archives: Pony Parade

Jinty #5, 8 June 1974

jinty-8-june-1974

Katie’s jinxing has a water theme this week, from jinxing water skiers to having the swimming team walk miles in the rain.

Judy tries to get help from the police about the haunting, but of course they’re not going to believe a thing like that. And Judy is even more terrified to realise that whatever is causing the haunting and making her friends dress like Victorian girls is going to target her next!

Gwen is riding high on the glory she has stolen. Of course that means a fall sooner or later, and it is already starting. Julie Waring is getting suspicious and has also overheard Gwen’s troubled conscience speaking out loud. Is Gwen about to be caught out?

The girls try to bust out of Misery House, but they not only fail but are also duped into playing a cruel trick on Carla, who was caught during the escape. One up to Misery House, but we know there will be a next time.

Angela’s Angels are accused of stealing, but it turns out the patient was foisting the blame onto them. We see acid-drop Angela has a heart: she sticks up for the Angels when they are accused and covers up for one somewhat errant Angel later on.

The scheming girls did not mean Yvonne to take a fall down the stairs when they soap the soles of her shoes, and only her acrobatic skills save her. It doesn’t cut much ice with jealous Lisa though, who is furious when Yvonne is chosen over her for the Dance of the Four Cygnets.

Miss Madden’s test for Mandy this week is very odd, even for her. She has Mandy dress up like a princess and then puts her in a posh room, where a two-way mirror enables Miss Madden and her colleagues to watch Mandy. Then Mandy panics for some reason when she hears the tune from a music box. Now what could have brought that on?

The influence of the Indian necklace has Gail’s friends turning away from her while she gets very sneaky and deceptive in getting what she wants. Daisy’s Victorian employers turn up their noses at coconuts and are not impressed with her fishing. It all ends up with their going hungry and Daisy slipping away, full of fish, so they don’t lumber her again. Dora helps out a dog that is being mistreated, but makes sure the dog doesn’t go to the dogs’ hotel either.

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Jinty 29 June 1974

Cover Jinty 29 June 1974

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi – and Mike White?)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: rosette)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • What’s Cooking? Rice, Vegetable curry (recipes)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Pony Parade 8 – Cara’s Secret (text story)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • Seeing Stars: Elton (pinup)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)

I am slowly making my way through the 1974 Jintys that I bought recently, while at the same time reading & annotating Mel Gibson’s book, “Remembered Reading“. Some people may have noticed an incomplete draft which was posted by mistake and then swiftly deleted – apologies for any confusion. The book review will be ready in a couple of days, I think.

The “Jinx” lead story continues. New girl Karen sobs heartbrokenly in true tear-jerker style as she exclaims that no-one understands her troubles. Katie is listening and sympathetic, and despite her typical clumsiness, she does manage to shake Karen out of her distress and into a laugh. Karen’s secret sorrow is that her best friend was drowned while they were swimming together, and naturally Karen feels it is all her fault! Not that she will allow Katie to tell anyone else – and so, of course, hijinks ensue.

In “The Haunting of Form 2B”, Judy Mayhew discovers a limitation to Miss Thistlewick’s ghostly power, but nevertheless is captured by her and brainwashed: “My name is Judith Victoria Mayhew. I was born in 1862…”

“Merry at Misery House” has thought up a clever trick to send a message to her parents – she writes a letter using different handwriting and they come to see what has happened and if something is wrong. Of course the wardens won’t allow a revealing message out beyond the four walls of the reformatory: if Merry spills the beans to her parents, Miss Ball will set the fierce dog onto her best friend, Carla. “If only they knew how awful it really is! But I can’t tell them.” Not that Merry is downcast for long – soon she has taken a splinter out of the fierce dog’s paw and befriended it, giving her a chance to try to escape!

Yvonne’s dream has turned nightmarish – following a bike accident she has lost her memory and is being exploited by a cruel woman who is giving her a place to stay and some work, but at a price. The club she ends up working in, doing acrobatic stunts in a fringed bikini, looks pretty sleazy!

Jinty 22 June 1974

Cover 19740622

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi – and Mike White?)
  • Seeing Stars: Donny (pin-up: Donny Osmond)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • What’s Cooking? Ham and Cheese Savoury, Flenjes (recipes)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Pony Parade 7 – Crusader’s Strange Catch (text story)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: flowered headband)

The relatively-serious Jinx story continues, still at the same rate of four pages in this issue. I guess it was seen as a proper lead story at this point, not simply an amusing aside. New girl Karen has been revealed as faking an injury to get out of swimming, which means that Katie is in the clear (her chums thought she’d injured Karen herself). But Katie starts to feel sorry for Karen, and sure that there is some reason behind the way she is acting. Various pratfalls later, Katie sees Karen crying in the school grounds, and trying to burn her old swimming costume. “I can’t stand it! I’ll never swim again! And nobody will ever understand! There’s nobody I can tell about it!” This last page of art, in particular, is classic Capaldi and beautifully done, whereas the cover page once again shows signs of collaborative work with someone who doesn’t do faces quite as beautifully.

In “The Haunting of Form 2B”, the sinister teacher Miss Thistlewick and her Victorian-influenced pupils become a little more sympathetic and vulnerable – the pupils are disturbed and saddened by the hostile reception they’re getting from their classmates, who think it is all a put-on and a bad joke. Miss Thistlewick offers a class trip as a prize for the best essay – on life in Victorian times, which the unaffected pupils tell her is very unfair! But the teacher’s aloof attitude is disturbed when a photo is taken of her alongside the affected pupils – she doesn’t at all want to included. The reason is obvious once it is developed – with no sign of Miss Thistlewick! Protagonist Judy hopes this will be the proof she can show to others (but in vain of course).

I said that the previous episode of “Merry at Misery House” was starting to show the divide-and-rule attitude beloved by repressive regimes. Merry finds out that no one is speaking to her because the warders have threatened dire punishment to anyone who does so. Her spirit is nearly cracked by this removal of her friends’ support – but not quite.

Jinty 15 June 1974

Cover 19740615

This is the earliest issue out of the batch of issues I recently bought from Peggy, filling in a big gap from the beginning of my run of Jinty.

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi – and Mike White?)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Pony Parade 6 – A Pony With a Purpose! (text story)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • What’s Cooking? Spaghetti Bolognaise, Torrone di Cioccolato (recipes)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: bird feeder)

It’s hard to be sure about the art on this issue of “Jinx”. The figures look very much as if they have been drawn by Mario Capaldi, but the faces less so; I think it must be a collaborative piece. Maybe, as happened with Capaldi at other points, he had over-committed himself work-wise in some way? It is also seemingly the start of an extended, relatively-serious story line for Katie Jinks – a swimming champion from another school is joining St Jonah’s but (of course) things are never so simple. In this four-page episode, new girl Karen is clearly faking an injury to get out of the swimming that she is well-known for – and Katie is unjustly getting the blame for the injury.

In “Merry at Misery House”, Merry is put in with the hardest of hard cases – the high-security section – but her capacity for keeping on going despite tough treatment wins even these girls over. Mind you, we never see these real tough nuts again – they are clearly a point being made by writer Terence Magee. The more striking point is probably the one that leads into the next episode, though – Merry’s real friends, Carla and the others – turn away from her when she is restored to them, precisely because it’s made clear to them by the warders that they will get worse and worse treatment the more they support Merry. Divide and rule… the influence of Terry Magee’s time in Francoist Spain is clear to see.

“A Dream for Yvonne” continues the story of the circus girl who longs to become a professional ballerina despite spiteful rivalries and family opposition. It is beautifully drawn but the faces are not very expressive, which does detract.

In “Gail’s Indian Necklace” the malevolent influence of the evil object is more and more like a pathology, a mental health issue – Gail’s obsessive behaviour and her changes in personality; her horror at what she has done once she comes out of it. The magical telepathy used in the story keeps it on a fantastical level, of course, but there are some quite striking moments where it could almost be done as a straight story about mental health.

Jinty 1 June 1974

Jinty cover 1 June 1974

This marks the first of the style of cover that I have remarked on previously: a page of “The Jinx From St Jonah’s”, promoted to the front page as an enticement to the reader. The layout is more boxy than is the case later on, with more panels and less of a ‘splash page’ feel (excuse the pun, given what is depicted here). Mario Capaldi’s art is nice, but not quite as elegant as it later becomes: Katie Jinx’s legs and arms in the first panel, in particular, are rather spindly.

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Rafart)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • Pony Parade 4: Snatcher’s Cleverest Trick
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • What’s Cooking? Omelette aux Champignons (recipe)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: bird mobile)

Jinty 18 May 1974

Jinty cover 18 May 1974

Stories in this issue:

  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Rafart)
  • The Jinx From St. Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Pony Parade 2: Don’t Call Me Ragbag!
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • What’s Cooking? Broad bean eggah, Spinach eggah (recipe)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: net bag)

Even as early as the second issue, Phil Gascoine has included a signature in one of his pages of art. (That is, it doesn’t seem done as a reaction to the success of a given story or title.)

I don’t know what happened to the bracelet from the first issue, but we used this hairbrush as a doll’s hairbrush for a long time.

Jinty 11 May 1974

Jinty cover 11 May 1974

Aha! I said earlier that I didn’t have the first issue of Jinty, but in fact it was there, a purchase subsequent to the bulk acquisition I made in my twenties of four or five years of Jinty. I have had some delays at home in getting a working scanner connected and tested, but that is now sorted so I am able to catch up with some scanning that was previously impracticable for me. (Many thanks to other fans, particularly to site co-writer Mistyfan, who have been supplying some missing scans that I didn’t already have scanned previously.)

Stories in this issue:

  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory (writer Alan Davidson)
  • Make Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Rafart)
  • The Jinx From St. Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • Pony Parade 1: Sandy, Come Home!
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • What’s Cooking? Cream of Carrot Soup, Cream of Corn Soup (recipes)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: pencil box)

This first issue has the wide mix of stories that characterises girls’ comics generally at this period: humour strips and gag strips (“Dora Dogsbody”, “The Jinx From St Jonah’s”, “Do-It-Yourself Dot”, “The Snobs and the Scruffs”, and “Desert Island Daisy“), a couple of spooky stories (“The Haunting of Form 2B”, “Gail’s Indian Necklace“), a slave story (“Merry at Misery House“), a Cinderella story (“Make Believe Mandy“), a friendship story (“Angela’s Angels“), and a deception story (“Gwen’s Stolen Glory“). In fact the weighting given to humour and gag strips in this first episode is a bit overwhelming, and this is quite soon slimmed down so that only a couple of these items run each issue.

The focus on this blog is generally going to be on the stories; my main interest is in comics and that is what people tend to remember most. It would be remiss not to at least sketch out some of the non-comics material included in some issues, though; in this first issue there is an editorial page introducing the new “story-paper”, advertising the next issue’s free gift, and promising competitions with great prizes. From the beginning, there is a request for input from the readers as to the stories that will be included: “let us know the stories you like in Jinty – and any you don’t like, too!”

The featured competition promises that you can “win £1 a week pocket money for two whole years!” (Cover price for this weekly comic was 5p, so this would be a very generous prize). The challenge was to collect the first four issues of Jinty and to then decide which of the following six occasions would you wear each of the “super outfits” shown in those issues. (Occasions being a country ramble, a friend’s birthday party, a record session with your chums, your brother’s school open day, a pop concert, and a special shopping spree in a big city.)

In addition to the competition, there was also a single page text story (“Sandy, Come Home!” – labelled Pony Parade 1 – and a “Jinty’s Fun and Games” page with single-panel gags and, coin tricks, and so on. Further on there was a page with some “Well I Never” surprising facts and a recipe for making soup. The last page was dedicated to a “Jinty made it herself… so can you!” item. In future issues the text story was gradually phased out (returning sporadically); the other items were reasonably regular types of feature. Of course in this first issue there could be no letters page yet.

Altogether, it does feel like a very packed-out issue, if not yet showing the unique slant that made Jinty special to me and lots of other readers.

Jinty 25 May 1974

Image

At the time of writing, I don’t have a copy of issue 1; issue 3 from 25 May 1974 is the earliest one I have. I don’t think I’ve even seen a cover for issue 2 in the past few decades, but I do remember that it had a give-away fold-up hairbrush in red, that we used for doll hairbrushing for many years after. Issue 1 had a free bracelet. (My sister is convinced of the efficacy of the give-away item, as she definitely attributes her choice of Jinty over other longer-established comics to that fact. It was her collection and standing order that I took over when she reckoned herself too old for comics, so I can only be grateful for that initial choice.)

Stories in this issue:

  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Haunting of Form 2B (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gwen’s Stolen Glory
  • Make-Believe Mandy (artist Ana Rodrigues)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)
  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Pony Parade 3: Whitesocks Rings The Alarm! (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • The Snobs and the Scruffs
  • A Dream for Yvonne (artist Miguel Quesada)
  • Gail’s Indian Necklace (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Desert Island Daisy (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • What’s Cooking? Fresh fruit salad, Yoghurt drink (recipes)
  • Angela’s Angels (artist Leo Davy)
  • Jinty made it herself… so can you! (craft: waterproof headscarf)

Edited to add: you may also enjoy the back page item, “Jinty Made It Herself… so can you!” This craft page, written as if by the title persona herself, was a feature of the early issues; later on there was still a craft page but not attributed to Jinty in the same way. Some of the ‘make and do’ suggestions are a little unlikely-seeming at this distance in time; a plasticated headscarf is not a very obvious thing for a girl of today to make, certainly, but I suspect it would have the potential to come out quite nicely.

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