Tag Archives: Sue’s Daily Dozen

Jinty & Penny 6 December 1980

JInty Cover 7

Cover artist: Mario Capaldi

  • Pam of Pond Hill (writer Jay Over, artist Bob Harvey)
  • Her Guardian Angel – first episode (Peter Wilkes)
  • Girl the World Forgot (artist and writer Veronica Weir)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Behind the Screen: Crossroads (feature)
  • Angela Angel-Face (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen (artist José Casanovas)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Winning Ways 36: Netball – Two more dodges

The buildup to the Christmas issue is well underway. In this issue, Jinty starts her 1980 Christmas story, to act as a filler and add to the Christmas theme over the holiday season. The story, “Her Guardian Angel”, was Jinty’s last Christmas story; by next Christmas she had merged with Tammy.

Pam of Pond Hill is trying to instil some Christmas spirit too, but it seems to be lost on everyone else. Pam gets permission to hold a Christmas party at school, which turns into one for the kids from the orphanage. But far from instilling the Christmas spirit Pam wanted, it has everyone quarrelling, and the blurb for next week warns us that more problems are ahead.

The Girl the World Forgot knows Christmas is coming, and the only present she wants is a ship to get her off the island she is marooned on. In the final panel, it looks like she is going to get one at last – but it is a Viking boat! What gives?

Thieves strike in “The Daily Dozen” and one of them even knocks Sue out. But as it is the cauldron they are stealing, we know the next episode can only “spell” trouble for them. Nadine does a whole new take on “roller disco”, with the aid of netball – again. Scheming Angela Angel-Face has wangled a trip to Meringaria, but she has not bargained on the company that comes with her – the very girls who know what she is really like. Tansy’s Dad tries pigeon-racing, and of course this causes mayhem for Tansy. Sir Roger loses his head – literally – because it is too windy. Next time he goes out, he wears full armour although there is hardly a breeze.

 

 

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Jinty & Penny 22 November 1980

JInty Cover 6

(Cover artist: Mario Capaldi)

  • Pam of Pond Hill (writer Jay Over, artist Bob Harvey)
  • Girl the World Forgot (artist and writer Veronica Weir)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen (artist José Casanovas)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Behind the Screen: Tiswas (feature)
  • Wheels of Fortune – Gypsy Rose story (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Winning Ways 34: Netball – catching
  • Child of the Rain – final episode (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Up, Up and Away! (feature)

It’s the final episode of “Child of the Rain”. It is finally revealed that what gave Gemma such incredible strength when it rains is now threatening her very life because it infected her leg. When conventional medicine fails, all hopes are pinned on Dad’s medicine man friend in the Amazon.

The tension intensifies in “Girl the World Forgot” when it looks like the unfriendly presence on the island has now become so unfriendly that attempts are now being made on Shona’s life. And to make it worse, Shona blows her chance of rescue and escape by lighting her beacon for Guy Fawkes – only to have a ship pass by next day and no beacon with which to signal for its help! But the growing menace gives you the impression that the story is now building towards its climax.

Phil Gascoine rarely illustrated a Gypsy Rose story, but he does so here with “Wheels of Fortune”, about a car and a mascot who bring good fortune to their family. But, as Dad discovers (though he does not admit it), bad fortune comes if the family abandons them. Gascoine was between serials at this point, so perhaps that was why he was commissioned to draw this story.

In “Pam of Pond Hill”, Mr Glover the French teacher finds himself being arrested by the gendarmes because they think he kidnapped the mystery boy who has been hanging around the French school trip! The blurb for next week says the gang are going to have a day to remember. Let’s hope that’s not because they are all going to end up in the Bastille or something.

Nadine now counts herself in on the netball team and she’s Goal Attack! But she’s still thinking more of disco. And the Daily Dozen provides Sue with a witch’s outfit to go with her cauldron and potion making. When the villagers see, they applaud the old witch Gran Hayden and her Daily Dozen. Now that makes a delightful change from superstitious villagers hating and persecuting girls they believe to be witches, as they do in “Wenna the Witch” and “Mark of the Witch!“.

 

Jinty & Penny 20 December 1980

JInty Cover 3

Cover artist: Mario Capaldi

  • Pam of Pond Hill (artist Bob Harvey, writer Jay Over)
  • Her Guardian Angel (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • Snoopa (artist Joe Collins)
  • The Friend from Far Beyond – Gypsy Rose story (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Behind the Screen: The Professionals
  • Angela Angel-Face (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen (artist José Casanovas)
  • Winning Ways 38: Netball
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Winter Warmers (feature)

It is the issue before the 1980 Christmas issue, so this issue is gearing up for it, the New Year, and the New Year lineup. The Mario Capaldi cover is unusual; it features neither a sport during the run of sports covers or a hint of the festive season. Instead it features campers – presumably campers braving the winter chill.

Pam of Pond Hill has run into a huge problem with her Christmas party for the kids from the orphanage – Mr Gold the headmaster has banned it, thanks to larking from Fred and Terry. Pam decides to hold it in secret with the help of the school caretaker so as not to let the kids down, but fate still seems to be against her. But next week is the Christmas issue, so things have to work out, right? Well, the blurb for next week says there will be a surprise visit from Father Christmas himself!

Gabbi, the over-zealous guardian angel, finally gives things a rest at Christmas dinner. But she overdoes it and gets the hiccups, yet she still adds some angel magic to the party!

Tansy wants to send out Christmas cards, but can’t find any. Will fortune favour her at the end of her usual Jubilee Street misadventures? And Sir Roger is trying to be fairy godmother, but he has no money to buy Gaye the present on her wish list.

It’s the penultimate episode of “Angela Angel-Face“, so another story is being cleared out for the 1981 lineup. The last episode could be interesting because in this episode Angela gets kidnapped! “Sue’s Daily Dozen” looks like it is heading towards its finish as well, because the latest spell says that the Daily Dozen’s work will be done once it is carried out. As for Nadine, she looks like she is still going strong and will last well into 1981.

 

Jinty & Penny 8 November 1980

JInty Cover 2

  • Pam of Pond Hill (writer Jay Over, artist Bob Harvey)
  • Girl the World Forgot (artist and writer Veronica Weir)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine – first episode (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Behind the Screen: Battlestar Galactica (feature)
  • The Face of Greed – Gypsy Rose story (artist John Armstrong)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen (artist José Casanovas)
  • Child of the Rain (artist Phil Townsend)

Another sports cover by Mario Capaldi. The use of colour really brings it out in the way the yellow contrasts with the blue and purple backgrounds. It is one issue that does not feature Phil Gascoine’s artwork; his last story, “Tears of a Clown“, finished in the previous issue.

Replacing “Tears of a Clown” is  “Life’s a Ball for Nadine”, a story that is very unusual for featuring a black girl as its heroine. The Greystreet School netball team needs another good player, and they find that new girl Nadine Nash has a natural talent for netball. The trouble is, Nadine is more interested in disco. Sally and Sue are determined to bring Nadine over to the team. Can they succeed, or will it be a story of disco vs netball?

Disco dancing is also big in “Sue’s Daily Dozen”; the magic of the Daily Dozen has a couple dancing like frogs in a disco contest and they win hands down!

“Child of the Rain” approaches its climax. Ever since Jemma West hurt her leg in the Amazon, she has been filled with a strange energy whenever it rains. This has caused a lot of problems and now there is another – Jemma’s leg is suddenly hurting where the old wound used to be. Jemma won’t tell anyone in case she is pulled out of the tennis championship. But it looks serious, so how long can she hide it?

The Gypsy Rose story, “The Face of Greed”, is a reprint of one of the more frightening Strange Stories. Tina Daly, a greedy, unpleasant girl, suddenly finds herself encountering a hideous, terrifying face in the attic. She is convinced it is an evil spirit come to punish her for stealing and hiding Mum’s jewellery. However, the title and opening blurb suggest it is a reflection of Tina’s own personality!

In “Tansy of Jubilee Street“, Tansy is out metal-detecting, which provides a golden opportunity for a practical joke from Simon and Peter. It takes the form of a fake World War II mine set to detonation, but they did not think through the consequences – their prank has a bomb alert going out! And in “Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost”, Sir Roger tries painting while Gaye has a panic when she thinks she has turned into a ghost.

Girl the World Forgot” has another missed opportunity at rescue; a plane swoops over her but the pilot can’t see her because it’s bad weather. And to make it worse (though Shona doesn’t know it) her own father was on board as well. The incident inspires Shona to set up a beacon, but will it be her ticket to rescue?

“Pam of Pond Hill” is into her classic story of her school trip to France. It looks like it is taking unexpected twists, what with a mysterious boy stealing Fred’s shirt and their food. One suspects he is a runaway, and whatever the circumstances are, they are sure to cause problems for Pam & Co.

 

 

Story theme: the Magical Companion / Non-human companion

Stories of magic and the supernatural often include a companion who helps, guides, prods, or sometimes rather forcibly plonks the protagonist in the middle of adventure. The companion in question has his, her, or its own agenda and in that, it has some similarities to the evil object which takes over people’s lives: but unlike the evil object story, the magical guide does not coerce or remove free will. Generally speaking, the agenda of the companion is at least morally neutral, if not positively on the side of the protagonist’s best interests. The journey towards a happy ending, though, is not in itself happy all along: often the life of the main character is made decidedly more uncomfortable as the story unfolds.

Normally the companion is clearly magical, maybe right from the start: sometimes she (rarely he) or it seems outwardly normal at first but is found in the thick of things too often for it to be a coincidence. This perhaps is particularly the case where the companion is an animal, such as one of the three(!) examples of magnificent white horses that help protagonists in various ways.

Core examples

The example I think is one of Jinty‘s best for this theme is “Guardian of White Horse Hill”. Janey Summers is an orphan, with foster parents who she is hoping will go on to adopt her. However, life with her new family is not easy, partly because of mean snobbish girls in the local area, partly because of trauma she hasn’t yet got over (badly handled by the adults in question, as usual), and partly because, well, she sees a white horse that no-one else can see. Obviously people start questioning her sanity as well as her temperament, but the horse in question turns out to be Celtic horse goddess Epona. Epona takes Janey back in time more than once, to the Celtic settlement originally located where the modern village is. In the historical time, Janey finds herself in the body of a young priestess facing the peril of a Roman invasion; in the modern time of the story, the village is threatened by a road which is to be built through the village itself. At the priestess’s behest, the Celtic villagers saved themselves by a non-violent path, namely digging a white horse on the hillside; the earth left over from all the digging is swept into the path of the invaders by torrential rain. In parallel in modern times, the path that the villagers were going to take – giving up and giving in – is derailed by Epona, who through Janey’s actions reveals the historical white horse carved on the hill. The villagers are able to declare this a site of special interest and hold off the road-building that way.

Even before Epona takes Janey back in time, she clearly reveals her magic to the reader: no-one else can see the horse apart from Janey, and when she gets on the back of the horse she is invisible to those around her. Ultimately Epona’s actions are in Janey’s interest too: by saving the village, the livelihoods of Janey’s foster parents are secured, but also Janey’s role in bringing that salvation helps to secure her wish to have real, loving parents again. There are uncomfortable moments for Janey along the way: for instance when Epona makes her dismount (so that she can then be seen by anyone who can spot her) just before a big village meeting. Even more so, you could point to the basic fact that making yourself visible to just one person is in itself asking to lead them into trouble – and Epona, magic though she is, is not a talking horse and does not explain herself.

Clear examples of this story theme in Jinty are:

  • “The Valley of Shining Mist” (1975) has a mysterious woman in a mysterious cottage in a mysterious valley – only when the mist fills the valley can the protagonist see the cottage as anything but an old ruin. Debbie is taught music by the woman in the cottage, but more than that, she also learns love and acceptance as Mrs Maynard helps her to change her life.
  • Corn Dolly in “Golden Dolly, Death Dust!” (1975-76), who guides and protects the protagonists in their battles against the evil witch Miss Marvell.
  • The eponymous horse in “Horse From The Sea” (1976) seems initially like a normal (magnificent, unbridled, appearing-out-of-the-blue) white horse, but a tale is recounted part-way through the story that makes it clear that this is the same mysterious horse that throughout centuries has defended the heir of the local estate from danger.
  • The mysterious Malincha in “Sceptre of the Toltecs” (1976-77) is golden-eyed, and inhumanly strong and smart. She needs the help of protagonist Jenny Marlow to fulfill her quest; you could perhaps consider Malincha to be the protagonist herself, but she is so characterless and mysterious that it is hard to see her in that role.
  • In “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag” (1976-79), the magical companion is another inanimate object: well, I say inanimate – the bag in question is given expression by the creases in the leather, giving her a cheeky look. This one is played for laughs too, and as an ongoing humour strip there is less of a clear agenda on the part of Henrietta the hand-bag as there is less of an overall story. Henrietta often helps Sue and gets her out of a pickle, but equally she often lands her in one too.
  • In “Daughter of Dreams” (1979), Sally Carter is a wall-flower until she makes up an imaginary friend, Pauline Starr. Her imagination is so strong she can see her new friend clearly – so clearly in fact that Pauline comes to life! Pauline helps to shake up Sally’s life, first of all by getting her to do more lively things so she can make more friends, and then in the sequel, “Miss Make-believe” (1979), defeating crooks in a stately house caper.
  • Karen finds a ghostly skating instructor in the “Spirit of the Lake” (1979-80): appearing to her as an elegant woman, the spirit is friendly and helpful to Karen in a situation where the girl is otherwise not shown much love or friendship. The skating spirit seems to have little agenda of her own other than to help Karen become a skating champion.
  • “Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost” (1979-81) has another ghostly companion but is an ongoing humour strip like “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag” (and indeed is drawn by the same artist too).
  • “Sue’s Daily Dozen” (1980) has an inanimate object as the magical companion, making it perhaps a slight stretch from the main theme of the category. Sue finds a book in the old cottage that she has moved into with her sister: the recipes in the book turn out to be more like magic spells, but very positive and homely ones intended to spread positive effects in the local community: sweets turn out to bring the childhood sense of fun back, and a love potion reconciles a quarreling couple. None of the spells are dramatically and clearly magic until the end of the story: the ambiguity of whether the odd effects are coincidental is maintained for quite a while, which is nice. In the end the book is reunited with the cauldron that Granny Hayden had also used, and both items disappear off to be found in the future by another lucky girl.
  • Gabbi is the magical companion in “Her Guardian Angel” (1980-81); literally a guardian angel, this played-for-laughs story has her defending her charge from all sorts of things that are not in fact dangerous. Gabbi has her own agenda: she has to pass a test to earn her wings, and earthbound Roz must therefore temper her normal way of being in order to help this angel who has become a friend.

Not in Jinty: Mistyfan has pointed out the Tracy story Rhoda’s Robot, in which the companion is not magical in origin, but a robot. (It’s a little arguable in my mind as to whether the robot really should be counted as non-magical as she doesn’t behave anything like a ‘realistic’ robot, but still.)

Edge cases

As with the other themes, you can see examples that don’t fit quite as clearly in the category but still have a lot of overlap with it.

  • “Wild Horse Summer” (1974) has (yet another) magnificent wild white horse which changes the protagonist’s life, but this horse really does seem to be a real-life horse who behaves reasonably realistically.
  • “The Zodiac Prince” (1978) in question is definitely magical; he is more protagonist than companion.
  • “Paula’s Puppets” (1978) is a little harder to categorise; I’d say it was a better match with the Evil Object / Supernatural Object theme as the puppets have a less clear agenda of their own, if any.
  • In “Pandora’s Box” (1979) Pandora has a little black magical cat, Scruffy, but he acts like a typical witch’s familiar, not as a magical guide.
  • “Sea-Sister” (1979) has a ghostly/magical character who again is more protagonist than guide or companion.

Related but different

  • There are other stories with animal friends or antagonists – cats, dogs, horses, birds and so forth in stories such as “The Big Cat”, “The Birds”, “Blind Faith”, “The Disappearing Dolphin”, “Finleg the Fox”, “Friends of the Forest”. As with “Wild Horse Summer”, these are animals that are given a generally realistic treatment.
  • Evil object / supernatural object, discussed separately.
  • Mysterious helper: a story type where someone is mysteriously helping the main character, but in a naturalistic way. The particular example in Jinty would be “Diving Belle”, where the protagonist gets training in diving by a female instructor who appears mysteriously and does seem to have more-than-natural knowledge of what is needed (what with being a gypsy, as obviously psychic powers come with that). Nevertheless she is a human and interacts with the main character in a human way.
  • Wish fulfilment: this can be magical/supernatural in nature (“Dance Into Darkness”) or through more naturalistic methods (“Jackie’s Two Lives”, “Kerry In The Clouds”). There is a trigger for the protagonist to have her wish fulfilled but that is not someone who accompanies her throughout the story guiding her.

Other thoughts

Bringing a magical companion into an otherwise ordinary girl’s life is always going to be a popular way to power a story; any reader could hold out a hope that just such a force could enter her own life and help her out with her difficulties. I guess it also makes sense that the writer can’t have the magical companion make things too straightforward for the protagonist as it’d be boring otherwise; the magical companion must therefore challenge or complicate the main character’s life as much as improving it.

Jinty & Penny 3 January 1981

 

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  • Pam of Pond Hill (writer Jay Over, artist Bob Harvey)
  • The Ghost Dancer – first episode (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Her Guardian Angel – final episode (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen – final episode (artist José Casanovas)
  • Land of No Tears – reprint (writer Pat Mills, artist Guy Peeters)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Hougton)
  • No Medals for Marie – first episode (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)

This was Jinty‘s New Year issue for 1981. As Jinty was cancelled later that year, 1981 probably was not all that happy for her. But in the meantime, Jinty had promised in her Christmas issue “that we’re kicking the [new] year off in style!” – and she does with the return of her “smash hit story from 1977” – Land of No Tears. This was brought back as a result of Pam’s Poll in 1980. Other new stories for the New Year were Phil Gascoine’s first Jinty story for 1981, “No Medals for Marie”, and what would be Jinty‘s last ballet story, “The Ghost Dancer”. This is the only story where I have seen Phil Townsend draw ballet, and he certainly proved with this one that he could draw ballet beautifully. If there are any other stories where Townsend drew ballet, I would like to know about them.

Readers expected more new material with the end of Jinty‘s 1980 Christmas story, “Her Guardian Angel” and “Sue’s Daily Dozen”. They are promised that Gypsy Rose will be back the following week. And being New Year, there is emphasis on New Year themes. This takes the form of Pam, Sir Roger and Tansy working on their respective New Year resolutions. Predictably, this has hilarious and unexpected results. Lastly, Jinty has a page of magic tricks for readers to do over the Christmas holidays.

 

 

Jinty & Penny 27 December 1980

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(artist Mario Capaldi)

This was the last Christmas Jinty issue. This time the following year, Jinty had merged with Tammy.

Jinty Christmas issues usually featured Christmas tie-ins such as Pam of Pond Hill’s Christmas party. The Christmas period often featured short filler stories, usually with Christmas themes, such as “Her Guardian Angel” and “Tale of the Panto Cat.” In Jinty‘s last year, short filler stories such as “Freda’s Fortune” and “Badgered Belinda” would mark the period of the final seven countdown issues to the merger.

  • Pam of Pond Hill (artist Bob Harvey)
  • Her Guardian Angel (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • Snoopa (artist Joe Collins)
  • An Ace Up the Sleeve – Gypsy Rose story (artist John Armstrong)
  • Tansy of Jubilee Street (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Angela Angel-Face – last episode (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • Gaye’s Gloomy Ghost (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Sue’s Daily Dozen (artist Jose Casanovas)
  • Life’s a Ball for Nadine (artist Mario Capaldi)