Tag Archives: Tony Higham

Tammy 14 August 1976

Tammy cover 14 August 1976

Cover artist: John Richardson

  • Bella at the Bar (artist John Armstrong)
  • Towne in the Country (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Storm over Jerra Island – Strange Story (artist Veronica Weir)
  • Tag Along Tania (artist Giorgio Giorgetti)
  • Bessie Bunter
  • Molly Mills and the General Strike (artist Tony Thewenetti, writer Maureen Spurgeon)
  • Wee Sue – artist John Armstrong
  • Drawn to Destiny – Strange Story serial (artist Tony Higham)
  • Odds on Patsy – final episode (artist Eduardo Feito)

The issue for 1976 in the Tammy round robin is 14 August 1976. The cover is one of my favourites. The Star Trek reference makes it particularly funny if you like Star Trek. It’s a change having a pesky kid brother (or is it a cousin?) instead of a kid sister for the Cover Girl to deal with. And there is another in-joke with the reference to Dan Dare, the famous space adventurer from Eagle. Tammy did not go for SF as much as Jinty – you see SF more often in the Strange Stories than Tammy’s serials – so it’s great to get an SF reference on the cover.

The Olympics featured heavily in Tammy in 1976, which was the year of the Montreal Olympics. Bella has an Olympics-themed story, complete with the Olympics rings being added to her logo. Bella is trying to reach the Montreal Olympics although she has no passport and was passed over for the British team thanks to Jed and Gert Barlow. Right now she is stranded in France with an acrobatics team. They are stringing her along with false promises of getting her to Montreal, and Bella has not yet realised their game. Moreover, her desperation to find gym equipment to train on has landed her in a sticky situation. Later the same year Tammy ran her Olympics-themed classic, Olympia Jones.

Screen Shot 2019-08-15 at 12.54.35 PM

Another thing to run strongly in Tammy in 1976 was stories published at readers’ requests, by open invitation from Tammy. One starting next issue is “Dumbells Academy”, about a school run by the most incompetent staff in the world. This story appeared at the suggestion of one reader: “I’d like to see a story about a school where all the staff are really nutty.” It replaces “Odds on Patsy”, a horse story where Tammy opted for a story on horse racing and jockeys, which makes a nice change from show-jumping. Could the same writer have written “Gail at Windyridge”, another story on jockeying that appeared in Tammy later on?

Expanded Strange Stories also appeared at readers’ requests, which ran for several episodes. The current one is “Drawn to Destiny”, about Diane Hudson, a girl who is jealous of her twin sister Sylvia. And when Diane takes up drawing, her jealousy takes a sinister turn when whatever she draws seems to come true. It starts really scaring her and she doesn’t know what to think, but her jealousy is intensifying too.

Although we have a Strange Story serial, the regular Strange Story continues. This week’s mystery is how the villagers of Jerra Island managed to evacuate from a volcanic island in the 19thcentury. According to legend, the pastor had a vision of it, but how did that happen? And how did Brenda’s church snowstorm souvenir get encased in lava for over 100 years near the site where the pastor saw the vision? She only bought it that day!

Girls’ serials did not often delve into politics, but Molly gets badly tangled in local politics when Lord Stanton has her and Pickering running a bus service during a nationwide strike in support of miners demanding better conditions. This does not please the strikers because it’s blacklegging. It is quite funny seeing the bully butler Pickering in a bus driver’s outfit though! However, Molly has worse problems now than the strike and blacklegging – she is trapped in a crumbling mine with Pickering and Lord Stanton.

Local politics are also a feature in Wee Sue. The council is building an old people’s centre but the oldies don’t want it because they don’t think it’s sound enough. Meanwhile, Sue and her friends would have loved the same site for a roller skating rink. Sue’s suggestion to the council: turn it into a community centre and convert the roof into a skating rink. Now everybody’s happy.

Tania Foster has always been the muggins and dumping ground of the gang of she hangs out with. Now she realises it, she is trying to stand up for herself. The trouble is, they keep finding ways to keep her put upon, including blackmail and dirty tricks. This week they push her into doing all their maths homework for them at the disco while they enjoy themselves and laugh at her. Too bad for them they forgot a noisy disco was not the best place for Tania to concentrate on maths and they end up in detention for “disgusting” homework. It is one of many instances where their treatment of Tania backfires. But Tania is still the muggins of the gang and finding a way to get them to treat her with respect is proving elusive.

“Towne in the Country” is a period story where All Creatures Great and Small meets “Cathy’s Casebook”. Valerie Towne and her vet father have moved to a new post in the country. Valerie soon realises she is going to be deeply involved in her father’s work, but she is not all that confident around animals. And there are other problems such as their vet’s clinic being a mess and queues of kids lining up with pets, expecting Valerie to cure them. And now Valerie and her father have a jumbo-sized problem – treating a sick circus elephant!

Bessie and her class go to the fair. After a series of mishaps, hijinks and getting messed up, everything ends happily for Bessie – with lots of food, of course.

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Tammy’s 5th Birthday Issue 7 February 1976

tammy-cover-7-february-1976

Cover artist: John Richardson

  • Sarah in the Shadows – first episode (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Return of the Silver Mare – Strange Story (artist Veronica Weir)
  • Lights Out for Lucinda – last episode (artist Ken Houghton)
  • Bessie Bunter
  • Molly Mills and the Aviator – first episode (artist Tony Thewenetti, writer Maureen Spurgeon)
  • A Monumental Detective – Strange Story (artist Tony Higham)
  • Wee Sue (artist John Richardson)
  • A Lead Through Twilight – first episode (artist Douglas Perry)

It is now 46 years since Tammy was first launched, on 6 February 1971. The first Tammy and Tammy’s 10th birthday issue have already been covered on this blog, so we will commemorate the anniversary with Tammy’s 5th birthday issue.

The Cover Girls are the first to honour the occasion, in their usual humorous style. Let’s hope they managed to sort out that little glitch with the birthday cake. Or maybe the Tammy team saw the funny side, just as the readers did.

As soon as we open the cover we see the first of Tammy’s “birthday gifts” to us, which is the first episode of “Sarah in the Shadows”. Tammy is celebrating her 5th with five new stories, two of which start this week, two next week, and the fifth the week after that. In Victorian times Sarah is thrown out into the street after her unfortunate uncle is thrown into debtor’s prison. All she has to survive on is her gift for paper cutouts and shadow play. The other birthday gift story, “A Lead Through Twilight”, is the last story in the issue (talk about bookends!). Carol Trent is losing her sight but won’t speak up about it or seek treatment because she is terrified her sourpuss uncle will send her away. But can she seriously expect to get away with hiding the fact that she’s going blind? And if the uncle finds out, will he do what Carol fears? Carol befriends a dog, Twilight, who could be her guide dog, but there is a definite mystery about him.

The birthday gift stories starting in the next issue are “The Fairground of Fear” (Diane Gabbot’s first serial for Tammy) and “Sit It Out, Sheri” (which will give John Armstrong a change from Bella). To make way for them, “Lights Out for Lucinda” is being finished off with a double episode. Lucinda has discovered the reason for the bizarre town of Blackmarket where everyone is being drugged into thinking it is still World War II and being forced to live that way. This peculiar ruse is all so the commander can provide a cheap workforce that are being paid 1940s rates instead of modern ones – to none other than Lucinda’s father! Fortunately for Lucinda it turns out he was a dupe and then a victim of blackmail before he finally manages to help put things right.

The last “birthday gift” story, starting 21 February, is a Hugh Thornton-Jones story, “Claire’s Airs and Graces”. Claire pretends to come from a posh background because of the snobby girls at her new school. This was the only Thornton-Jones serial in Tammy; his artwork was otherwise confined to Wee Sue episodes and Strange Stories.

It looks like the Storyteller is celebrating too because he is presenting two Strange Stories this week. Molly apparently is celebrating with a new story, but the title really should say “aviatrix”, not “aviator”. Although Bessie’s caption says “Bessie celebrates our birthday in her own special way”, her story has no bearing whatsoever on the celebrations or even on birthdays. She’s trying to help catch bank robbers but has forgotten the licence plate number of their vehicle. The police are trying to jog her memory but of course she is more interested in eating. Wee Sue’s story also has nothing to do with the celebrations. It’s all hijinks when Miss Bigger gets herself locked in a ball-and-chain because she disregarded a “do not touch” sign: “I’m a teacher. It doesn’t apply to teachers.” Silly woman!

Of course there is a competition to mark the occasion too, but this won’t be until next week.

Pre-Misty merger: Tammy 12 January 1980

tammy-cover-12-january-1980

Cover artist – John Richardson

Contents

  • Sister in the Shadows (artist Giorgio Giorgetti)
  • Cindy of Swan Lake (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Daughter of the Desert (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Important News for All Readers! (merger announcement)
  • The New Girl – Strange Story
  • Edie the Ed’s Niece (Joe Collins)
  • Bessie Bunter
  • Molly Mills and the Promotion – last episode (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Wee Sue (artist Robert MacGillivray)
  • Make the Headlines, Hannah! (artist Tony Coleman)
  • Everything in the Garden – Strange Story (artist Tony Higham)
  • Edie’s Hobbyhorse – Tie ‘n’ Dye

tammy-and-misty-ad

This is the Tammy that came out the same week as the final issue of Misty. So what did the issue have to say about the Tammy & Misty merger and how did it prepare for it?

The first hint of it comes on the cover, with the Devil in a sandwich sign announcing “there’s exciting news in Tammy – on sale now!” I’ve always been struck at how that Devil character bears a striking resemblance to Pickering, the bully butler in Molly Mills. Is Tammy having a bit of an in-joke here?

As far as room goes, there is not much space to make room for a reasonable proportion of Misty stories. All the serials are still running and one, “Sister in the Shadows”, is only on its second episode. The announcement about the merger informs Tammy readers that not only will all their regular favourites be there but there will also be a new Bella story starting. In other words, Tammy isn’t reducing any of her own features to make room for more features from Misty, such as “Beasts”, “Nightmare!” and (we suspect) “Monster Tales”. There must have been great disappointment among former Misty readers that the proportion of Misty was miniscule compared to the Tammy one. I myself hoped that once the current Tammy stories finished more Misty stories would take their place, but I was disappointed there. Why couldn’t Tammy have done some double episodes of Hannah, the serial closest to finishing, so she would be finished off by the time of the merger and there would be more space for Misty stories in the merger issue?

In discussion of the stories, in part two of “Sister in the Shadows” Wendy continues to have what must rank as one of the worst first days at school in history. On top of the king-sized collywobbles she came with, she is encountering constant embarrassment and humiliation as teachers keep comparing her to her sister Stella, who was once the star pupil at the school, and Wendy can’t live up to their expectations. It’s not endearing her to her fellow classmates either and the stage is clearly set for some bullying.

“Daughter of the Desert” features a school that is strangely reverting to a desert pattern after an Arabian princess comes to the school. In an exciting but very odd episode, the two protagonists find themselves in a quicksand trap, which is supposed to be part of the strange desert pattern. Then the quicksand mysteriously disappears into a hard concrete road when the girls return with their headmistress to investigate.

Cindy decides to throw away her ballet career for the sake of her swans, who are being poisoned by chemical pollution. Despite the pollution the swans find the strength to persuade Cindy to continue, much to the chagrin of Cindy’s jealous rival Zoe. Now Zoe is now back to scheming against Cindy to become the star dancer of their village.

Molly Mills gets promoted but deliberately sets out to lose it once she decides she was happier with the status quo as a servant. Miss Bigger buys a sedan chair for charity – but trust her to lumber Wee Sue and her friend with the job of carrying it to her place! Then thieves steal the chair, and it’s up to Wee Sue’s big brain to sort them out. The promise of a hamper lures Bessie out for ice-skating practice, but of course there have to be hijinks.

Hannah’s latest attempt to hit the headlines fails again because her prop got vandalised. At first she suspects her sisters, who have been sabotaging her every effort so far, but now she isn’t so sure. Sounds like a mystery to tie up, and will it have any bearing on Hannah’s campaign to prove herself?

There is a double-up of Strange Stories this week. The first is about a new girl named Stella who is perfect at everything. But Tracey Roberts thinks there is something odd about it all, and about the star on the bracelet Stella always wears. Then, when the star falls off Stella’s bracelet she falls mysteriously ill and Tracey gets strange visions from her parents urging her to find the star. The second is a parable about how beauty can be found even in the most unexpected places. Once Chris Dale learns this lesson she agrees to have the eye surgery she had refused before.

Incidentally, the blurb announcing the new Bella story says she will have a crack at the Moscow Olympics (which of course will be a “struggle”). Older Bella readers would know that she had never succeeded in competing at the Olympics. Her 1976 Montreal bid only got her as far as performing in the opening ceremony. Will Bella succeed in competing at the Olympics this time?

Jinty Annual 1978

Cover Jinty Annual 1978

Cover by Audrey Fawley

In this annual:

  • House of Secrets (artist Ken Houghton)
  • For Love of Smudge (text story written by Linda O’Byrne, illustrated by Terry Aspin)
  • Luck of the Draw: A Dora Dogsbody Story (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Salt, Mustard, Vinegar, Pepper (quiz)
  • Alley Cat
  • Shelagh’s Shadow (artist John Armstrong)
  • Potty Proverbs (poem)
  • Maker of Dreams (text story, possibly illustrated by Tony Higham)
  • It’s a Puzzle!
  • Nature’s Wonderful Ways (feature)
  • Take It With A Pinch of Salt (feature)
  • “Purrfectly” Puzzling!
  • A Great Partnership (Fonteyn and Nureyev pin-up)
  • Beautiful Butterflies (feature)
  • Cook Up A Party! (feature)
  • Jiffy Jewellery! (feature)
  • The Gift of Christmas (poem)
  • Girl Pearl Divers of Japan (feature)
  • The Lost Valley (Uncle Pete story; artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Blue and the Babe (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Nature’s Wonderful Ways (feature)
  • Jinty Sets You Some Teasers (puzzle page)
  • Good Knight! (text story, illustrated by Terry Aspin)
  • Black Friday (artist Christine Ellingham unknown Concrete Surfer artist)
  • Spirit of the Snows
  • Be Snap Happy! (feature)
  • Where Is My Mother? (Uncle Pete story; artist Alberto Salinas)
  • What A Giggle! (gag cartoons)
  • Nature’s Wonderful Ways (feature)
  • Naomi’s Moment of Truth (text story, illustrated by Christine Ellingham unknown Concrete Surfer artist)
  • Attacked By Condors! (non-fiction feature)
  • Pretty Clued-Up? (quiz)
  • A Life For a Life (Uncle Pete story; artist John Armstrong)
  • Washday Blues (text story)

Now this is a proper Jinty annual! It has lots of recognizably Jinty artists (Jim Baikie, Trini Tinturé, Ana Rodriguez, Terry Aspin), plenty of good solid stories, and a nice long complete story that has intrigue, sports, and dramatic cruelty. Oh wait, that last bit makes it sound like Tammy too!

“House of Secrets” is a straightforward-enough ghost story with a happy ending; Ken Houghton’s art seems a little on the stiff side here, but overall the story works well. Text story “For Love of Smudge”, illustrated by Terry Aspin and written by Linda O’Byrne, is a read that gives more back; the plot of fed-up mother manipulated by a so-called friend, all of which impacts badly on the girl protagonist and her dog Smudge, raises it from being a straight-forward animal story.

For The Love of Smudge

The Dora Dogsbody story is here drawn by Jim Baikie; it’s nice to see a Jinty regular even when drawn by an unexpected artist (if also a Jinty regular himself). Baikie does a good job but I can’t help feeling that his Ma Siddons, in particular, ends up rather more hag-like than when drawn by the more slapstick Casanovas.

Luck of the Draw! pg 2

“Shelagh’s Shadow” is the long story, presumably reprinted from June. I guess that when that title ended, John Armstrong moved in directions that did not primarily include Jinty – he was featured in Tammy, of course, and I suppose that might have taken up a lot of his time until he was perhaps brought over to Misty by Pat Mills. This story has great swimming and diving sequences, and the strong depiction of facial expression that Armstrong is particularly good at, so it must have been right up his street. Ann Brent is the mysterious girl who shadows swimming champ Shelagh; Ann is under the thumb of her frightening guardian and swimming coach and multiple layers of deception need to be unravelled before the end.

Shelagh's Shadow pg 1

Mistyfan has posted about the 1982 annual which includes a good dose of Gypsy Rose stories; Gypsy Rose had just about started in Jinty by now but perhaps was not solidly enough established to feature in the annual? For whatever reason, all the strange storyteller spooky tales in this annual were ‘Uncle Pete’ reprints. The second to last of the stories reprinted has a signature showing it is by Alberto Salinas, a beautiful Spanish artist.

Uncle Pete - Where Is My Mother?

There are two outings for the artist I think is the “Concrete Surfer” unknown artist – the first in the complete short story “Black Friday” (thrilling adventures with wildlife and the wild outdoors). This is competent but looks like an early outing for this artist as a comics artist. The text story “Naomi’s Moment of Truth” has rather more polished artwork which works well; the story is one of broken friendship and lesson-learning, quite realistic actually.

I don’t have the 1982 Annual that Mistyfan acclaims as possibly the best of the Jinty annuals; nevertheless, this is a great one well worth looking out for.

Gypsy Rose’s Tales of Mystery and Magic

Dates: 29/1/1977 – 21/11/1981
Tammy and Jinty: 28/11/1981 – 17/7/1982
Artists: Various, including Terry Aspin, Jim Baikie, Guy Peeters, Phil Townsend, Trini Tinturé, Carlos Freixas, Douglas Perry, Keith Robson, Christine Ellingham, Douglas Perry and Hugo D’Adderio.

Image

(artwork by Keith Robson)

Spooky storytellers. The storytellers who bring you a spooky tale of mystery, creepiness, paranormal, magic, fantasy and even horror every week. Often there was a moral in it, with girls learning about courage and confidence, paying the price for bad behaviour, or some other lesson or experience they will never forget. Spooky storytellers were extremely popular mainstays in girls comics, and a spooky storyteller was guaranteed to last for years and even decades, as the Storyteller who brought us The Strangest Stories Ever Told proved. The Storyteller went through three comics – School Friend, June and, finally, Tammy. Other spooky storytellers included The Man in Black from Diana and Skeleton Corner from Judy/M&J. And Jinty had Gypsy Rose (no relation to Gipsy Rosa Remembers from Diana). ‘Gypsy Rose’s Tales of Mystery and Magic’ debuted in Jinty on 28 November 1977.

Gypsy Rose, as the name suggests, is a gypsy woman whose Romany understanding of the supernatural, not to mention her wanderings as a gypsy where she can encounter adventures in more distant places, brought an extra advantage to her stories. And from the beginning, Gypsy Rose showed us that she was going to break the conventional mould of the spooky storytellers in several ways. First, while most other storytellers were older people with a parental or creepy look to them, Gypsy Rose was a young woman. Second, Gypsy Rose not only told us the story but was often a story character as well, somewhat like DC’s Madame Xanadu. While she opened some stories with a panel to open the story and then a concluding panel to round it off as other story tellers did, she also took an active role in other stories as a supernatural consultant who has been called in for advice. This was only natural as she was a gypsy, who was expected to not only understood the supernatural but have powers of her own as well. The only one we really see is Rose consulting her crystal ball to answer a client’s query. The other is how, whenever she is called in, she always seems to know the story behind whatever is plaguing the consultant and able to tell them what is going on. How she knows is never revealed, though we do see her doing research in a library occasionally.

As Rose often acted as a supernatural advisor, her stories were set in the present and centred on ghosts, curses, strange happenings, and evil objects, places or people. For example, in ‘The Box of Hate’, one girl comes to Rose saying that she is being blamed for strange activities that are destroying her guardians’ shop. Rose comes along, traces the problem to a box which is inhabited by a poltergeist, and has the box buried. In ‘The Haunted Ballerina’, another client comes to complain of a malevolent force emanating from a mirror that she has just bought. It seems to be out to destroy her dancing career. Rose tells the client that the mirror is haunted by a jealous ballerina who hated to see others dance because she could not do so following an accident. The evil ends up destroying itself. We never see Rose fighting evil with exorcisms, magic charms or spells, though in one story she urges an angry god to stop chasing a girl who took a bracelet from a sacred site.

Whenever Rose was an actor in her stories, it brought one drawback – they had to be set in the present. There could be no period settings (except in flashback or in one case, time travel), science fiction stories, or fantasy stories dealing with mythical beasts and such, as could be done in the Storyteller stories as he merely narrated the story, not acted in it. So story material was limited to supernatural-based themes. Only in stories where Rose was the narrator could there be more diversity in the themes explored.

By 1980, the Gypsy Rose tales were all reprint. Some of them were reprints of her own stories, but others were reprints of old Strange Stories from Tammy and even June, but replacing the Storyteller with Rose. As such, she was now more a narrator than an actor and consultant. This did have the advantage of bringing more diversity to the story material. We began to see more period stories, fantasy and even a bit of science fiction. It also enabled artwork from non-Jinty artists such as Giorgio Giorgetti, John Armstrong and Diane Gabbot to appear in Jinty and give readers a taste of these artists. On the other hand, a fallback on reprints is never a good sign for a comic. All too often it reflects cost-cutting measures and/or that the comic was declining and approaching cancellation. Indeed, Jinty would merge with Tammy the following year.

After the merger, Gypsy Rose was rotated with the Storyteller in the spooky story slot until 17 July 1982, with the launch of a new-look Tammy. Her stories in the merger were new material and not reprints or recycled Strange Stories as they were in Jinty‘s final year. When the new-look Tammy appeared, spooky stories continued but their narrators disappeared – even the long-running Storyteller.

Here is the first Gypsy Rose story, “The Ring of Death”, from Jinty and Lindy 29 January 1977; art by Jim Baikie.

Gypsy Rose Ring of Death pg 1

Gypsy Rose Ring of Death pg 2Gypsy Rose Ring of Death pg 3

List of Gypsy Rose stories in Jinty (incomplete, to be added to as issues are posted)

  • 29 January 1977: The Ring of Death (artist Jim Baikie)
  • 5 February 1977: The Box of Hate! (Artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • 12 February 1977: Dream of Destiny (artist Rodrigo Comos)
  • 19 February 1977: Hide and Seek with a Ghost! (artist Maria Barrera)
  • 5 March 1977: The Doll’s Dark Secret (artist Terry Aspin)
  • 12 March 1977: So Long at the Fair (artist Keith Robson)
  • 19 March 1977: The Hound from Hades (artist Terry Aspin)
  • ….
  • 2 April 1977: The Holy Stones (artist Terry Aspin)
  • 9 April 1977: The Bells (artist Christine Ellingham)
  • 23 April 1977: The Gemini Girl (artist Maria Barrera)
  • 30 April 1977: Cassie and the Cat (artist Terry Aspin)
  • 7 May 1977: A Storm of Vengeance (artist Jim Baikie)
  • 4 June 1977: The Strawberry Handkerchief (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • 25 June 1977: The Lost Locket (artist Phil Townsend)
  • 2 July 1977: The Wish on Devil Rock! (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • 9 July 1977: The Winged Spirit (artist unknown)
  • 16 July 1977: The Magic Tambourine (artist Douglas Perry)
  • 23 July 1977: Suburst! (artist unknown)
  • ….
  • ….
  • ….
  • 3 September 1977: The Last Rose of Summer (artist Christine Ellingham)
  • ….
  • ….
  • ….
  • ….
  • 15 October 1977: Lilies for the Bride (artist Christine Ellingham)
  • 22 October 1977: The Eternal Flame (artist Richard Neillands; writer Alison Christie)
  • 5 November 1977: The Thirteenth Hour (artist Douglas Perry)
  • 12 November 1977: The Carnival of Flowers (artist Guy Peeters)
  • 3 December 1977: A Picture of the Past (artist and writer Keith Robson)
  • 24 December 1977: The Spirits of the Trees (artist Christine Ellingham)
  • 31 December 1977: Snowbound! (artist Keith Robson)
  • ….
  • 29 January 1978: The Eyes of Chang (artist Terry Aspin)
  • Jinty Summer Special 1978: The Stone of Courage (artist unknown)
    • The Mirror That Knew The Truth (artist unknown) – reprint
    • 5 May 1979: Captive of the Stars (artist Juan Solé)
  • 4 November 1978: Wicked Lady Melissa (artist Shirley Bellwood) – reprinted from June
  • Jinty Holiday Special 1979: The Ghost of Charlotte (artist unknown) – reprint
  • Jinty Annual 1979: Chain of Destiny (artist Carlos Freixas) – reprint
    • Violetta’s Donkey (artist Richard Neillands) – reprint
    • Midnight Express (artist unknown)
    • Una the Unsinkable (artist Rodrigo Comos) – reprint
  • 5 January 1980: Did Taffy Know? (artist unknown)
  • 16 February 1980: The Poisoned Rose (artist Trine Tinture)
  • 23 February 1980: Oasis of Dreams (artist Phil Townsend)
  • 1 March 1980: The Haunted Circus (artist Carlos Freixas) – reprint, source unknown
  • 5 April 1980: Bridge of Heart’s Desire (artist Trini Tinturé?) – reprint from June, reprinted in Tammy
  • 21/28 June 1980: The Magic Hockey Stick (artist Dudley Wynne) – reprint, source  unknown
  • 6 July 1980: Unscheduled Stop (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 12 July 1980: The Dark Tower (artist unknown) – reprint, original source unknown
  • 19 July 1980: A Light for the Loyal (artist Bill Mainwaring) – reprint, source unknown
  • 26 July 1980: The Romany’s Reading (artist Jim Baikie)
  • 2 August 1980: The Last Leap (artist Giorgio Giorgetti) – reprint from Tammy
  • 9 August 1980: The Magic Carpet (artist unknown) – reprint, original print unknown
  • 16 August 1980: Pictures of Peril (artist unknown) – reprinted from Tammy
  • Jinty Holiday Special 1980: Rock of Destiny (artist Rodrigo Comos) – reprinted from Tammy
    • The White Blackbird (artist John Richardson)
    • Porthole of Panic (artist unknown)
    • The Yellow Dress (artist John Richardson)
    • Laddie (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • 23 August 1980: Lure of the Lamp (artist Christine Ellingham)
  • 30 August 1980: Black Rory’s Curse (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 13 September 1980: Phantom of the Fells (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 20 September 1980: Wheels of Fate (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 27 September 1980: Pennies for Her Thoughts (artist Douglas Perry) – reprinted from Tammy
  • 4 October 1980: A Call for Help (artist Terry Aspin)
  • 11 October 1980: Only Time Will Tell (artist Diane Gabbot), reprinted from Tammy
  • 18 October 1980: The House of Hate and Happiness (artist Giorgio Giorgetti) – reprint from Tammy
  • 25 October 1980: Dawn of a New Era (artist Ken Houghton) – reprinted from Tammy
  • 1 November 1980: The Secret of Covent House (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • 8 November 1980: The Face of Greed (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 15 November 1980: A Cross for the Cornish Queen (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • 22 November 1980: Wheels of Fortune (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • 29 November 1980: The Demon Eye (artist Ken Houghton) – reprinted in a Penny annual
  • 20 December 1980: The Friend from Far Beyond (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • 27 December 1980: An Ace Up the Sleeve (artist John Armstrong)
  • 3 January 1981: no Gypsy Rose story
  • 10 January 1981: Correct Error (artist Manuel Benet) – reprint from Tammy
  • 17 January 1981: A Gift for Gaynor (artist unknown)
  • 24 January 1981: Race against Time (artist unknown) – reprint from Tammy
  • 31 January 1981: Gail at Sea (artist unknown) – reprint from Tammy
  • 7 February 1981: The Lollipop Man’s Promise (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones) – reprinted from Tammy
  • 14 February 1981: Friends for All Time (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • 21 February 1981: Zebras of Zendobo (artist Peter Wilkes)
  • 28 February 1981: The Golden Touch (artist Peter Wilkes) – reprint from Tammy
  • 4 March 1981: Farah’s Three Wishes (artist Hugo D’Adderio) – reprint from Tammy
  • 11 March 1981: No Expectations (artist Hugo D’Adderio)
  • 21 March 1981: Kathie Come Home! (artist Hugo D’Adderio) – reprint from Tammy
  • 28 March 1981: The Queen’s Vengeance! (artist Trini Tinturé) – reprint from June
  • 4 April 1981: Arrow of Fate (artist unknown) – reprint, original source unknown
  • 11 April 1981: The Puppet That Came to Life! (artist Carlos Freixas) – reprint from June
  • 18 April 1981: Whispers In The Wind (artist Antonio Borrell) – reprint from Tammy
  • 25 April 1981: The Missing Link – (artist unknown) – reprint from Tammy
  • 2 May 1981: The Lost Chord (artist Eduardo Feito) – reprint from Tammy
  • 9 May 1981: The Seal People (artist unknown) – reprint, source unknown
  • 26 May 1981: Ancient Remedy (artist Hugo D’Adderio)
  • 23 May 1981: Shark! (artist unknown) – reprint, source unknown
  • 30 May 1981: The Unlucky Rabbit’s Foot (artist Carlos Freixas) – reprint from Tammy
  • 6 June 1981: The Dove of Peace (artist Bob Harvey)
  • 13 June 1981: The Resting Place (artist Veronica Weir)
  • 20 June 1981: Russalka (artist unknown) – reprint from Tammy
  • 27 June 1981: The Broomstick Gymnast (artist Veronica Weir) – reprint from Tammy
  • 4 July 1981: The Lap of Death (artist John Armstrong) – reprint from Tammy
  • 11 July 1981: A Monumental Detective (artist Tony Highmore) – reprinted from Tammy; reprinted in Girl Picture Story Library #19 as “The Crook Catchers”
  • 18 July 1981: Call from the Heart (artist Hugo D’Adderio)
  • 25 July 1981: The Veiled Threat (artist Tony Highmore) – reprint from Tammy
  • 1 August 1981: The Witching Bones (artist Veronica Weir) – reprint from Tammy?
  • Jinty Holiday Special 1981: The Bracelet of Love (artist Jim Baikie) – reprint from Tammy
    • They Always Know (artist Robert MacGillivray)
    • When Things Go “Bang” in the Night… (artist unknown) – reprint from Tammy
  • 29 August 1981: Money isn’t Everything! (artist Bob Harvey)
  • 5 September 1981: Tiger Burning Bright (artist unknown) – reprint, source unknown
  • 26 September 1981 Child’s Play (artist Phil Townsend)
  • 3 October 1981: The Wish on Devil Rock! (artist Trini Tinturé) – reprint
  • 10 October 1981: The Robber Bird (artist Isidre Mones)
  • ….
  • ….
  • 31 October 1981: The Marble Heart (artist Carlos Freixas) – reprint
  • 7 November 1981: The Sable Knight (artist Keith Robson)
  • 14 November 1981: The Secret World (artist Keith Robson)
  • 14 November 1981: The Spirits of the Trees (artist Christine Ellingham) – reprint
  • 21 November 1981: A Window on the Past (artist Hugo D’Adderio) – reprint