Tag Archives: Valley of Shining Mist

Jinty 21 June 1975

JInty cover 21 June 1975

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx from St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (unknown artist – Merry; writer Terry Magee)
  • Jinty’s Favourite Spooky Stories – The Sobbing Sands (complete story)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist – (artist Carlos Freixas, writer Alan Davidson)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • “The Green People” (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Philip Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Keep Tidy with My Tortoise! (Feature)

A couple of issues ago Cinderella Smith received instructions on how to make a cute cloth tortoise, which she used to make a birthday present. Perhaps Jinty is now sharing the instructions, because this week’s craft feature is how to make a cloth tortoise, which can be used to keep your things tidy.

Speaking of Cinderella Smith, she starts her career as a model this week, and it all has to be done behind her cruel cousins’ backs. This presents a problem when Cindy realises she has to get her cousins’ signatures for the modelling contract, and she knows they won’t sign voluntarily.

The reformatory staff really show just how corrupt and criminal they really are in this week’s episode of “Misery at Misery House”. They help evil farmer Leggatt force Barry to sign the contract signing away the farm. How? They tell Barry they will have him arrested on trumped-up charges if he does not sign. Barry gives in – but then there are signs that Merry’s call for help to the child welfare officer could be paying off…

Katie’s teacher hopes she’s not always a disaster when there’s water around because she wants to butter up a school governor so the school will get permission to use his houseboat. Fat chance. The episode ends with Katie on a runaway motorboat that is too powerful for her to handle!

Things look up for Barbie as she acquires a guide dog and a job at a ballet company. It looks like a chance to advance her love of ballet at last – but the episode ends with Barbie in danger of falling down the stairs. Moreover, the obligatory jealous rival of the piece has now started her nasty scheming against Barbie.

The Valley of Shining Mist won’t take Debbie in this time and she knows it is because she stole a silver hairbrush from there. However, Debbie’s nasty relatives are trying to stop her efforts to return it. So Debbie is finding she has to acquire some lessons in backbone as well as honesty.

Julie’s campaign to stop Mr Blackburn’s motorway and save the Green People, is going ahead and looking strong. Unfortunately it has cost his brother his job. Furthermore, there is a new enemy in the form of Julie’s teacher, Miss Berridge, who happens to be a cousin of the Blackburns.

For a brief moment it looks like Daddy’s heart has melted towards the two evacuees. However, he hardens up again to the point where he won’t allow their mother to visit because he doesn’t want his darling to catch any germs from her. That man is just impossible. Is there nothing that can get through to him?

In this week’s “Dora Dogsbody” there is a mishap with hair-restorer lotion that causes a dachshund to grow long hair! They have to keep Ma Siddons from finding out.

This week it looks like Greg and Flo will be reconciled. Then a television producer discovers the shabby flat Flo has been staying in and blames Greg for the state his sister has been reduced to. Are the twins set on a collision course again?

 

Jinty 14 June 1975

Jinty cover 14 June 1975

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx from St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (unknown artist – Merry; writer Terry Magee)
  • Cuckoo Clock Competition
  • The Valley of Shining Mist – (artist Carlos Freixas, writer Alan Davidson)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • “The Green People” (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Philip Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)

Katie the Jinx breaks the school goldfish bowl (she would) and has to replace it. Trouble is, she’s broke and has to use her brains to find a replacement – while going through her usual scrapes, of course.

Ana Rodriguez had quite a track record in drawing ballet stories, and now she’s illustrating “Blind Ballerina”. Our blind ballerina has a very bad run this week, and it’s only part two of her story. She’s had a road accident, can’t find her sister Daisy, her blindness leads to disaster at her new circus job, and the circus boss has turned so nasty that he’s threatening to set a dog on her.

“Merry at Misery House” and her friends find the mean farmer is abusing his stepson Barry as much as he is abusing them, and is trying to force Barry to sign over the farm to him. Merry and Co step in to help, and also take an opportunity to phone a children’s welfare officer about Misery House. So will there be help at last for the abused inmates? Or will their enemies foil them again, as they have so many times before?

Cinderella Smith’s off to the ball – er, friend Susie’s birthday party – this week. It turns out better than expected when Susie’s Dad spots how photogenic she looks in the party photos and wants to sign her up with a modelling contract. Wow, Prince Charming already! Unfortunately, Cindy’s still in the clutches of those abusive cousins and we can be certain they will do everything they can to stop her.

Debbie comes back from the Valley of Shining Mist with a new ambition to take up violin – and a silver hairbrush she’s stolen from the Valley. Her abusive family notice both the hairbrush and the new violin Debbie buys and are not impressed. Their abuse drives Debbie to run off. But will the Valley emerge from the ruins it dissolved into earlier and take her in again?

The dogs’ hotel is taking in Susi Sparkle, a famous pop star dog this week. The dog is not top of the pops with Ma Siddons after she breaks Ma Siddons’ new colour TV, pinches the food (in her sleep), and causes Ma Siddons to get a black eye!

This week Flo turns pop star herself. Greg won’t perform at a charity show at the children’s hospital – too much under the influence of his mean-looking manager. So Flo dresses up as Greg and performs in his place. Unfortunately Flo did not count on a newspaper photographer being there, and it’s all going to be all on the front page tomorrow! What’s Greg going to say when he finds out his estranged sister has been impersonating him?

The evacuee children liven things up for Lee when they help her get rid of the old dragon of a tutor that Daddy hired for her. However, Daddy gets even worse than usual when the anniversary of his wife’s death approaches, and takes it out on the poor evacuees.

Julie’s efforts to help the Green People unwittingly get her brother Chris into trouble; the company thinks he’s been leaking information about the new motorway. The Green People soon tell Julie the real reason why the company wanted it kept top secret – people will protest against it. Which is precisely what they do after the Green People discreetly spread the word around – telepathically!

The issue also advertises the first issue of Lindy, which is out next Saturday. The free gift is a charm bracelet. The ad doesn’t entice you with descriptions of the stories. Instead, it tells you that there is a pin-up of the Bay City Rollers waiting for you if you buy the first issue.

And Jinty has a new competition where the prize is a cuckoo clock. Unscramble the names of some birds and you go into a draw to win.

Carlos Freixas

Slave of the Mirror 1aSlave of the Mirror 1bSlave of the Mirror 1c

Carlos Freixas Baleito (31 October 1923 – 26 February 2003) was a Spanish artist. Freixas had a long career in girls’ comics in a wide range of titles. At IPC his artwork appeared in Valentina, Marilyn, June, Misty, Tammy and Jinty. At DCT, he drew for Bunty, Mandy, Tracy, Nikki, Judy, Emma, M&J and Spellbound. He had a fluid style that lent itself to a diverse range of stories, including supernatural, horror, period, adventure and school. An incomplete list of Carlos Freixas stories for DCT can be found at http://girlscomicsofyesterday.com/?s=carlos+freixas

Freixas started out as an illustrator at the age of 14, guided by his father Emilio Freixas. He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts and, as his father’s assistant, published his first work in Lecciondes. Freixas and his father then began an association with the publishing house Molino. This collaboration eventually resulted in the publishing project Mosquito, which they started with the aid of Angel Puigmiquel in 1944. At this time, Freixas created his first character, ‘Pistol Jim’, who appeared in Gran Chicos and later Plaza El Coyote.

In 1947, Molino asked Freixas to join the Argentine division of their publishing house, so Freixas moved to Buenos Aires, where he established himself as a well-known and respected artist. His first Argentine work was for Patoruzito, where he created the boxing ‘Tucho, de Canilla a Campeón’ and several detective (‘Elmer King’) and motor comics (‘Juan Manuel Fangio’). He often collaborated with Alberto Ongaro, who wrote ‘Drake el Aventurero’ for him and with whom he illustrated Hector German Oesterheld’s scripts for ‘El Indio Suarez’. Freixas was also the author of ‘Darío Malbrán Psicoanalista’ for Aventuras.

In 1956, Freixas returned to Spain because of homesickness, and resumed his collaboration with his father and cooperated on most of his father’s illustration work. He also took on agency work for the British market through Creaciones Editoriales, where he broke into IPC and DCT titles.

Back in Spain, Freixas contributed to Juan Martí Pavón’s magazine Chito in 1975, made a comics adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s ‘Gaspar Ruiz’, and some horror stories for Bruguera. In the last years of his career, Freixas worked for US comics, which included Marvel’s Monsters Unleashed. He also worked for Swedish comics (‘Joe Dakota’ stories for Semic’s Colt) and Dutch comics, where he was a regular artist on stories like ‘Marleen’ for the Dutch girls’ magazine Tina.

Source: https://www.lambiek.net/artists/f/freixas_carlos.htm

Carlos Freixas stories in Jinty

Jinty 27 September 1975

Jinty 27 September 1975

Stories in this issue:

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Golden Dolly, Death Dust! (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas, writer Alan Davidson)
  • Song of the Fir Tree (artist Phil Townsend)
  • “The Green People” (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Barracuda Bay (artist Santiago Hernandez)
  • Ping-Pong Paula (artist Jim Baikie)

Katie Jinks finds that a simple game of football kicks off some gender wars between her girls school and the local boys school, with the girls ending up trying to beat the boys at stereotypically ‘boys’ activities and the reverse. Luckily, they’re all amusingly hopeless at everything! It continues in the subsequent week’s issue too.

The Blind Ballerina escapes from near-death and is rushed straight to the theatre for her debut as a prima ballerina! But a further turn of fate awaits her on stage – Barbie hesitates visibly in front of the audience, who don’t know that she is blind and therefore do not realise the joyous feeling she has as she can suddenly see again! Will it be only temporary, or will she get to see her little sister with her newly-regained sight?

Despite some protective rowan berries, the evil Miss Marvell has managed to get a patsy to do the dirty work of pinching the corn dolly from Lucy’s bag at school – leaving the girls defenseless against her dark works, unless they manage to steal her back.

In “Dora Dogsbody”, a mix-up of hairdressers sees Ma Siddons getting the latest hair-cut – for a poodle! Heh heh, she does look a fright.

Debbie Lane has tasted success for the first time in “Valley of the Shining Mist” – thanks to the mysterious Mrs Maynard she has won a talent competition, but forgotten the challenge that she was set by the same lady. It turns out (after she has spent most of the prize money) that the challenge is to bring the whole lot – £100 – to the Valley to hand over! As her nasty cousin Elaine says, surely Debbie’s being taken for a ride!

Sister and brother Solveig and Per are literally taken for a ride in “Song of the Fir Tree”: they are making their way across Germany to return to Norway, hiding in the back of a lorry. When it stops at a checkpoint, the kids are locked up by Russian soldiers, but not for long – their lovely singing voices see them fed, clothed, and helped on their way to the next stage. Not that they are safe for long, of course…

The saga of “The Green People” is nearing its end. Evil aunt Zella has sent the true rulers of the peaceful underground world to meet the giant monster Krakengerd, expecting them to be slain. That may yet happen, along with their friend, surface dweller Julie!

In “Ping-Pong Paula”, table tennis champ Paula continues to be torn between her Mum and her Dad. Mum has left the house in disgust and taken Paula with her – but where can they stay? Family can’t help, and the friend they end up staying with is not really a good friend to Paula, even if she is to her mother…

Further updates from Pat Davidson

(comment sent by email)

I have found another of Alan’s stories for your computer tests – and this one is actually noted and dated as being for Jinty. “Kerry in the Clouds” ran from April 1977. Copy of the script’s p. 1 of Instalment 1 is attached for interest. This may not have been one of his best as by this time he was focusing more on writing books. It’s perfectly true, as correspondents have recently pointed out, that a writer had to be very prolific to make a good living in the comics market.

I’ve located a few more of Alan’s scripts but I’m unable to identify the publications, as he wrote for so many different ones, including Tina in Holland and Editions Aventures et Voyages in France. I do remember, as mentioned previously, that he particularly enjoyed writing “Fran of the Floods” and “Valley of Shining Mist” and these were both for Jinty. As for any others, it will be interesting to see what the computer comes up with.

Alan Davidson Kerry In The Clouds script

Kerry In The Clouds pg 1
Art by Emilia Prieto – penname of Cándido Ruiz Pueyo

[editorial comment] Pat, I’m sure that if you are able to supply titles of stories, the combined knowledge of readers of this blog and other related internet sites will help to identify the publications!

“Kerry In The Clouds” is not one of the best-remembered of all Jinty stories and I think it is probably true to say that it is not on the same level as “Fran of the Floods” or “Jackie’s Two Lives”. I do have a soft spot for it though.

Pat Davidson writes to the blog

I am very excited to say that Pat Davidson has written in to reply to the comments made by Malcolm Shaw’s wife, Brenda Ellis. She clarifies that, contrary to the information previously supplied by Pat Mills, Pat Davidson did not write for Jinty herself, and indeed did not write the classic “Little Miss Nothing” which she has been wrongly credited with. Here are her own words to explain:

How much I agree with Mrs Shaw that – like her late husband Malcolm –  some, at least, of the men who wrote for Jinty took their work seriously, writing stories of real quality.  And I know how hard they  worked. In the 1970s, when we too had a mortgage to pay – and four children under eight – my husband Alan Davidson wrote many wonderful stories for Jinty, including “The Valley of Shining Mist”, “Fran of the Floods“, “Gwen’s Stolen Glory” and – one of Jinty’s all-time favourites – “Jackie’s Two Lives“.  In earlier years, he had written the breakthrough “Little Miss Nothing” which was often reprinted and became the template for a stream of ‘Cinderella’ stories written (in my opinion) by lesser writers.

After Jinty, Alan wrote many successful books for children in various genres, including humour and no doubt Malcolm Shaw, had he lived, would have done likewise.  IPC’s policy not to credit writers or artists was a disgrace and I’m grateful that Alan kept careful records, including copies of all his scripts together with his invoice books (IPC tending to be rather late-payers)! Although I remember Alan mentioning Malcolm’s name as a fine writer, sadly I have no knowledge  of which stories he wrote. Perhaps someone else will remember for Mrs Shaw? I do hope so.

Pat Davidson also kindly sent in a photo of the young Alan Davidson.

Alan Davidson, author of various Jinty stories such as "Jackie's Two Lives"
Alan Davidson, author of various Jinty stories such as “Jackie’s Two Lives”

I hope that this blog will be able to follow up this very interesting contact and to give further details on other stories written by Alan Davidson. On a personal note, I am particularly happy to know the authorship of “The Valley of Shining Mist”, which is a story that lived on in my memory from reading it as a child.

Jinty 19 July 1975

Jinty 19 July 1975

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • The Happy Ghost (spooky text story)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Father Knows Best! (poem)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • The Green People (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)

Part two of Katie’s babysitting story. Someone breaks in and it’s all hijinks as Katie gets ready to tackle a burglar jinx-style. But is he a burglar or has Katie blundered again?

It’s crunch time in The Valley of Shining Mist to see if Debbie passes the test of overcoming her stammer by winning a poetry reading contest. She surprises herself and her detractors by getting through two verses without a stammer, with a little help from the Shining Mist. But that won’t be enough to win – or will it?

The going is getting rougher for Barbie because she won’t tell anyone she is blind. It’s causing misunderstandings and now she’s been injured because she couldn’t see a stool had been shifted.

The plan to get sick Hilda out of Misery House and into medical care with the gypsies is underway. But Miss Ball and the Warden are out to destroy the camp, which could ruin everything.

Mrs Siddons has an unsavoury track record of undercutting the dogs’ food in order to save money for herself, and this week she does it again. But of course she pays for her meanness in the end.

It’s getting even harder for Cinderella Smith to keep her modelling secret from her cruel cousins – she’s being mobbed by autograph hunters.

More and more people are finding out about The Green People – Moura escapes from the soldiers, but now she ends up in a circus where she is put on show as a freak. Fortunately Julie has a plan to rescue her.

Daddy still won’t open his heart to the Hope children – his love is all reserved for his darling, who is ill in bed after searching for the Hopes.

Greg and Flo finally seemed to have sorted things out. Unfortunately the greedy manager isn’t having that and is scheming to come between them.

Jinty 12 July 1975

Jinty 12 July 1975

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Jinty Makes…Treasure Trove! (feature)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • The Green People (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)

It’s babysitting time for Katie, and you can imagine that’s not a good combination with her jinxing. And then a mysterious intruder adds to the problem.

The first test of the Valley of Shining Mist is for Debbie to overcome her infamous stammer. We should have guessed.

Cinderella Smith is beginning to realise just how difficult it is going to be to hide her modelling from her cruel cousins – the job itself is plastering her face everywhere.

Not even the Misery House nurse cares about the sick Hilda, so it’s up to the girls to get help. And it arrives in the form of a gypsy girl named Jessie who can virtually waltz in and out of Misery House when she wants to – now that says something about its security. And Jessie’s giving Miss Ball even more cheek than Merry!

Poor blind Barbie is still undergoing her humiliating punishment. Then things begin to look up, but not for long – Barbie ends this episode in trouble with the law.

A bully teacher is a new enemy for Julie and the Green People, and she gets off to a good start by taking the necklace Julie uses to communicate with them. And now Moura’s been captured by the soldiers.

In “Daddy’s Darling”, Daddy is being booed and hissed for his treatment of the Hope children but it does nothing to soften his attitude. As far as he is concerned, all the love he has is reserved for his darling. And now they’ve run away because of him. So now the story is heading towards its climax and ending.

Flo’s kind nature is now proving good PR for her brother Greg, whose arrogance has not made him popular. But he doesn’t look like he is softening – until Flo finds he has left flowers on their parents’ grave.

In Dora Dogsbody, Mrs Siddons demonstrates her meanness when she tries to put a dog down because his owner has defaulted on the bill and Dora is trying to save him. It turns out the dog’s habit of pinching the mail was to blame. And we are informed Mrs Siddons will get a lesson about meanness next week. But we bet it won’t last long.

Jinty 5 July 1975

Jinty 5 July 1975

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas)
  • The Green People (artist Phil Gascoine)
  • Beyond the Call of Duty! (spooky text story)
  • A Basinful of Super Prizes…worth over £400! (competition)
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Do-It-Yourself Dot (artist Alf Saporito)

The competition featured on the cover reduces Katie the Jinx (who normally starts on the cover) to a two-pager. This time Katie jinxes herself – with sunburn on her tummy. Meanwhile, in Dora Dogsbody it’s tennis trouble this week when Mrs Siddons goes all out to impress the Chairwoman of the local tennis club.

Barbie impresses the judges with her dancing, but her blindness and refusing to tell anyone about it causes a misunderstanding that gets on the wrong side of them. And they give her a humiliating punishment that jealous Sylvia is taking advantage of.

Mrs Maynard of the Valley of Shining Mist offers to give Debbie violin lessons – but Debbie must pass a series of tests to receive them. Yes, this story is well and truly in the spirit of fairy tales now.

Cinderella Smith pulls the same dirty trick her cousins pulled on her – tricking them into signing a contract – in order to get her modelling career started. But that’s the easy part. The problem will be keeping up her modelling against the ill-treatment from her cousins.

New girl Hilda Bolton arrives at arrives at Misery House. Like Merry, she’s been wrongly convicted. Worse, she’s clearly ill and not strong enough to take the misery – which the staff and Adolfa make extra-worse for her. Eventually she collapses and Merry fears she is dying.

Jinty has started a run of spooky text stories – something we will see on a regular basis in Misty. You have to wonder what the motivation could be here for such a series and how long it lasted. Jinty had a brief stint on text stories in her early issues, but did not run text stories in earnest until 1981, with spot panels from the stories being enlarged for the covers.

Things keep going wrong for Flo, and she gets into more and more trouble with her brother. Things are not going so well for the Green People either when authorities discover a ladder they left behind is made from an unknown metal. Now the military are involved! And in Daddy’s Darling, Daddy gets worse than ever when he discovers who his new maid really is. But the blurb for next week suggests that the hard-heartedness he showed in this episode is going to rebound on him. And we also learn it’s the time Japan bombed Pearl Harbour.

Ads tell us it’s now the third issue of Lindy, which would merge with Jinty after 20 issues. They also inform us that the Lindy Summer Special is on sale from 3 July. Only three issues in and Lindy is already producing her first summer special? Perhaps  it was so the special would time with the summer holidays.

Jinty 7 June 1975

Jinty 7 June 1975

  • The Jinx From St Jonah’s (artist Mario Capaldi)
  • Blind Ballerina (artist Ana Rodriguez) – first episode
  • Merry at Misery House (writer Terence Magee)
  • Jinty Makes a Jaunty Bolero (feature)
  • Dora Dogsbody (artist José Casanovas)
  • The Potted Peril! (poem)
  • The Valley of Shining Mist (artist Carlos Freixas)
  • Daddy’s Darling (artist Phil Townsend, writer Alison Christie)
  • The Green People (artist Phil Gascoine) – first episode
  • Cinderella Smith (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Face the Music, Flo! (artist Jim Baikie)

For once Katie is ousted off the cover in favour of a gorgeous splash cover that introduces us to a new story, “The Green People”. This story is Jinty’s first science fiction story, and no doubt sets the stage for things to come, including “Fran of the Floods”, “Almost Human” and other science fiction classics from Jinty.

The other story that starts this issue is in a more traditional vein – the tradition of blind ballerinas who are determined to become ballet stars. But they have to overcome the obstacles of their disability and prejudice as well as the typical jealous rivals and bad luck.

Cinderella Smith is the most extreme Cinderella story I have seen in that the ill-used heroine is forced to work in chains! Not even Cinderella herself suffered that humiliation. Fortunately our heroine has figured out how to pick the locks on them and is working on other escape routes so she can slip off to a party.

In “The Valley of Shining Mist”, it is more the fairy-godmother for our ill-treated heroine, when she finds herself in the magical Valley of Shining Mist for the very first time and meets Mrs Maynard. But things are not going to be a fairy-tale ending so easily, especially when Debbie’s bad habits from her ill-treatment lead her to steal a hairbrush from Mrs Maynard.

The Warden farms out Merry & Co as slave labour to a farmer. And somehow we get the feeling that it is a hint of more underhand things going on at Misery House. Meanwhile, the girls find a sympathiser who helps alleviate their plight. But then he gets found out and the farmer is now planning something nasty.

Slaving is something Flo is also forced to when she takes a job at Greg’s club and also has to sleep in a condemned house. And when her brother finds out he is not pleased because he is such a bighead now.

“Daddy’s Darling”, Jinty’s first World War 2 story, features Lee Simons, a heroine who suffers a very different sort of unhappy home life. It takes the form of a father who is so overprotective that he withdraws her from school to teach her at home. And the teacher is a dragon! Sounds just like “The Four-Footed Friends”, which appeared some years later. But instead of dogs upstaging the overprotective parent, it’s friends from school who come to share Lee’s lessons when their school is bombed.

How would you like a day off school? Just call in Katie Jinx to jinx the entire school staff packing. And this is what she does in her story this week. Pity they couldn’t put Katie in Lee’s class.

It’s fancy-dress parade time in Dora Dogsbody, with Mrs Siddons determined that she will not be upstaged as Nell Gwynn. And to this end she dresses Dora in a clown suit. But guess who ends up with the booby prize?