Tag Archives: Waking Nightmare

Jinty 6 May 1978

jinty-cover-6-may-1978

The Concrete Surfer finds sneaky Carol cheated to put up the winning design for their skateboard tee shirts. She’s now so fed up with smarmy Carol being Miss Bainbridge’s pet that she wants to walk out on the skateboard club.

A woman gets on Sue’s nerves with her bossiness and endless spouting of old proverbs, and Sue reckons the woman doesn’t even know what those proverbs mean. Oohh, sounds like an open invitation for Henrietta to hand out another lesson with her mischief-making magic.

The Swan is up to mischief of an even more nasty nature. She’s poisoning her own pupils against Katrina with false stories and sneaky tricks to make Katrina look a thief in order to turn them against her because they were trying to help her. At least Sarah is still friendly and is treating Katrina to a ballet performance.

It’s the final episode of “Waking Nightmare”. Phil realises she should have heeded newspaper reports that Carol was not quite right in the head. But Carol’s mother admits it was partly her fault for concealing it because she was ashamed to let people know her daughter was mentally ill. Phil helps Carol overcome her fear of doctors and everything works out happily.

“The Birds” is on its penultimate episode, and it’s only the second one. There was so much scope to make this Hitchcock-inspired story longer, so why did they just keep it at three episodes?

“Shadow on the Fen” is clearly nearing its end as we’re told the story will reach its climax next week. This week The Witchfinder attacks Mrs Perks, the only ally of Linden and Rebecca. At least they manage to get hold of his book, the second magic artefact they have to destroy to destroy him. However, he managed to get away with his last artefact, the magic knife.

Cathy saves the life of a critically ill man, but the old sourpuss isn’t showing her any gratitude. Dad takes her out for a treat, but there could be a surprise when someone asks if there is a doctor in the house.

The Zodiac Prince is trying to work out what’s upsetting the clown he’s standing in for. Then he and Shrimp find a photograph that could be a clue.

 

Jinty 22 April 1978

jinty-cover-22-april-1978

Last week Jean believed she had finally seen through Carol as “a smarmy little creep!” But she repents when Carol really puts on the waterworks. Did she really hurt Carol’s feelings or has the smarmy little creep worked her way around her again? Meanwhile, Jean takes on some advice to bring some rhythm and flow into her skateboarding and is making progress. However, could Carol be trying to discreetly undermine it?

In “Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag!” some bullies always pick on a girl and call her names. Naturally, Henrietta decides to give them a taste of their own medicine, which gets a bit out of hand. They end up in detention, but it’s a fitting punishment for bullying.

The Swan has made a slip that she knew the slave’s parents. But she twists it around with another lie: the slave’s parents died in prison for theft and she may have inherited their bad ways. It’s an old trick in “amnesiac” serials and it does what the Swan intended: the slave becomes demoralised and begins to doubt herself.

Carol comes to the rescue of Phil, who’s under a pile of debris. However, Carol seems to be going to pieces because the debris is reminding her of something.

The Zodiac Prince casts a spell on a girl to make her attractive to animals. It was meant to save her from a tiger, but it backfires when every single animal in town follows the girl all the way home, and the spell starts messing things up at the circus as well. Father tells the Prince he can’t remove the spell, so he suggests another to modify the first. But will it work out?

It’s the final episode of “Paula’s Puppets”. Paula’s in a cross-country race but isn’t up to it with nobody to support her. Then, all of a sudden, Dad is there to cheer her on. But he’s supposed to be in prison! What gives?

Linden manages to get the plant to cure Rebecca, despite the Witchfinder trying to stop her by turning himself into the largest rat you ever saw. Next they learn how to stop the Witchfinder – destroy his three magic items – but they have to track them down first.

Cathy thinks her father needs a break and leaves the phone off the hook so he won’t be disturbed. But this could lead to real trouble if there is an emergency…

 

Jinty 1 April 1978

Jinty cover

  • Concrete Surfer (writer Pat Mills)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Slave of the Swan – first episode (artist Guy Peeters)
  • Waking Nightmare (artist Phil Townsend)
  • The Zodiac Prince (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Paula’s Puppets (artist Julian Vivas)
  • Rinty ‘n’ Jinty
  • Shadow on the Fen (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Darling Clementine – final episode (artist Richard Neillands, writers Alison Christie)

My latest Jinty acquisition, thanks to Marc, and it complete several runs of Jinty stories in my collection. Among them are the last episode of “Darling Clementine” and the first episode of “Slave of the Swan”, the story of an amnesiac girl who falls foul of a spiteful ballet mistress who has a grudge against her mother. Next week we see another of Jinty’s classic stories, “Cathy’s Casebook”, and its blurb shows how well advanced the preparation for this story must have been. We are told that Cathy will save a lonely old shepherd, help an injured girl to walk again, stop a backward boy being persecuted, and solve an outbreak of food poisoning.

In the other stories, things are stepping up. Paula’s beginning to realise how nasty she has been to everyone in the past and she is partly responsible for the mean treatment she gets from them now. But her efforts to change backfire and make her even more unpopular. And to make it even more interesting, her wrongly-convicted father has escaped from prison! Is it the key to clearing his name or just to add drama to the story, and his vindication lies with Paula and her puppets?

In “Shadow on the Fen”, the witch finder turns up in the 20th century and Rebecca discovers how her friend Catherine took the witch-hunting rap for her at his hands in the past. Next week things are going to step up even more as the girls find out one of the witch finder’s secrets.

The Zodiac Prince’s latest effort to help someone impresses his father this time, and next week he tries fortune telling at a fair. How easy can that be when you’re the Prince of the Zodiac? Or will it be harder than we expect?

The Concrete Surfer wonders if she has got things wrong about Carol and is trying to be nicer. But is she doing the right thing or playing straight into Carol’s hands?

And in “Waking Nightmare”, Phil Carey is blaming herself for Carol’s disappearance because she realised too late that Carol had a phobia about trains. Fortunately she finds Carol and now they’re off to her grandmother’s. But when they arrive, the occupants are definitely not Gran! What has happened?

Jinty January 28 1978

Jinty cover

  • Come into My Parlour (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Two Mothers for Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Concrete Surfer – first episode (writer Pat Mills)
  • Meet the Singing Stuntman Actor Gareth Hunt (feature)
  • Rinty ‘n’ Jinty
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • Race for a Fortune – final episode

Well, this is the issue that begins one of Jinty’s best remembered stories, Concrete Surfer. Skateboarding is the only thing to come out of Jean Everidge’s stay in Australia. Her family are losers who failed at everything in Australia. Jean comes back to Britain, where cousin Carol and her family are the opposite – successful and well off. And Carol likes nothing better than being the centre of attention. The trouble is, when Jean is on a skateboard, she is the centre of attention. This will make skateboarding the bone of contention between the two cousins for the duration of the story.

Ironically, skateboarding also features in the final episode of “Race for a Fortune”. Katie’s sneaky cousin Rodney barters for a skateboard to get ahead of Katie’s roller skates in the final lap on the race. Fortunately for Katie, Rodney is nowhere near as good as Jean on a skateboard. But with a name like Ebenezer, you have to wonder what the uncle has really left for the winner of the race. “Race for a Fortune” will be replaced next issue by a much darker story, “Paula’s Puppets”. In fact, Jinty dares us to be honest – would we do as Paula does when she finds some weird puppets with strange powers? Maybe, maybe not. But then, surely we are not embittered by the same ordeal that Paula faces in this story – being bullied and stigmatised after her father is imprisoned for insurance fraud. He protests his innocence but is not believed. However, that is a story for another entry on this blog.

In the other Pat Mills story in this issue, “Land of No Tears“, the Gamma girls are doing really well in the finals. And judging by the Hive Inspector’s attitude towards the Gamma girls, we can imagine that he is not pleased. But Cassy is still bound by her bargain with Perfecta to throw the swimming marathon, which will mean they lose the trophy and their one chance of better treatment. However, the blurb for next week tells us that fate is going to take a hand, so there be even more readers eager to buy the next issue!

In “Two Mothers for Maggie”, Maggie gets a break from her abusive stepfather. But then her mother falls ill and is taken to hospital. Good breaks never last long for heroines – until the end of the story, that is. In “Waking Nightmare”, Phil is trying for a break of a different kind – breaking into Hardacre House to rescue Carol. So far she has not had much success, and now she is finding there is a mystery about the house itself. Another reason readers will be lining up for the next issue. And in “Darling Clementine”, Ella is trying for jobs to raise money for her water-skiing equipment to get into the club. But the snobby girls at the club are not making her welcome, and we are told that next week they will get even more spiteful. And in “Come into My Parlour”, Mother Heggerty forces Jody into even more spiteful acts, this time at a department store.

Lastly, this issue advertises the first issue of Misty. For some reason we are told the issue will be on sale on 30 January although the issue will be dated 4 February.

Jinty 21 January 1978

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Chang 2

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Chang 3

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Chang 4

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  • Come into My Parlour (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Two Mothers for Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare (artist Phil Townsend)
  • She’s an Angel! Clare Clifford (feature)
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)
  • The Eyes of Chang (artist Terry Aspin) – Gypsy Rose story
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • Rinty ‘n’ Jinty
  • Race for a Fortune
  • Sew Yourself a Sash! (feature)

I dug this particular issue out because the Gypsy Rose story featured on the cover has really stuck with me. For this reason the cover does as well. I decided to upload the story itself along with the cover.

The cover promises us that this is a chilling story, and it sure delivers. It ends on a grimmer note than most Gypsy Rose stories, despite Rose’s reassurances to the heroine that she will find happiness if she forgets. Usually evil is vanquished in Gypsy Rose stories, but not in this case. It is still there, ready to strike again, in the form of an evil, possessive dog who will go to any lengths, including murder, to get rid of anyone who he sees as coming between him and his mistress. We really feel for anyone the mistress hires in the future (or probably has hired in the past) and hope the dog hurries up and dies.

“Race for a Fortune” enters its penultimate episode. It’s a race across to the finish line. And the legendary monster (no, not Nessie) said to inhabit the loch they must cross? It turns out to be a money-making fraud, but helps Katie to get ahead of her scheming cousins after they smash her raft. She is setting off again, in a rowboat.

In “Land of No Tears“, the threads that will be tied up in the concluding episodes become manifest here. Cassie begins to discover the identity of the mystery trainer as her disguise comes off, and she is in for a big surprise when she sees the woman’s face. But we don’t see what the surprise is until the next issue. Perfecta manages to blackmail Cassie into throwing the swimming marathon in the finals after she discovers Miranda is seeing her mother illegally. On the other hand, Perfecta looks like she is seriously overdoing her training in her crazy determination to win the event…

Meanwhile, in “Darling Clementine” Ella’s training for the water-skiing event is not going well. The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak. And poor Ella is still being wrongly blamed for Clem’s accident and is not even allowed to visit her in hospital. She has to pay surreptitious ones.

In “Come into My Parlour”, Jody is still under the power of Mother Heggerty, who is forcing her to harm the Saxton family. But her sister Tess has begun to notice things. Can she help?

Meanwhile, the parents in “Two Mothers for Maggie” are no help to her – in finishing her homework. The extra chores she is forced to do are making it worse and worse and slaving is all step-dad sees Maggie as fit for. Miss Keyes offer to talk to them, but will they see reason? We will have to wait until next week to find out.

And in “Waking Nightmare”, Phil Carey believes she has finally tracked down the institution where Carol is being held. But how to get in?

Finally, we have the blurb that “Concrete Surfer” will start next week. “Start the gripping story of this rebel on wheels in your next super JINTY!” Funny, the blurb says the issue will be out on Monday, January 23 – but this issue is January 21. Looks like a typo.

Jinty 25 February 1978

Jinty 25 February 1978

This is the third consecutive issue I’ve posted in date order over the past few days: I wanted to get out an issue to show spooky story “Come Into My Parlour” but was so entranced by the covers of the issues after it that I then wanted to post them all. It’s a cover very of its time: I showed it to my brother yesterday and he said ‘is that from around 1978?’ without looking at the date itself. The skating gives it away of course, but yeah, he could identify it as precisely as that just from the cover.

“Concrete Surfer” is interesting in the way it’s written: protagonist Jean is actually pretty quiet in terms of how much she says out loud, but her inner monologue is sharp and rather bitter. Told by the advertising man to do some solo skating while smiling, she thinks to herself “I don’t feel like smiling at the moment, but I’ve got to, otherwise I don’t get paid…”. We don’t hear her accuse her cousin Carol of being the smarmy, spiteful girl that Jean thinks she really is, or not out loud, so for quite a long time it hangs in the balance as to whether Jean is right in her judgement of the world, because no crisis is caused by her blurting out something sudden.

Stories in this issue:

  • Concrete Surfer (writer Pat Mills, artist Christine Ellingham)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Two Mothers For Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare! (artist Phil Townsend)
  • The Zodiac Prince(artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Paula’s Puppets (artist Julian Vivas)
  • Shadow on the Fen (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)

 

Jinty 18 February 1978

Jinty 18 February 1978

Isn’t this a great cover combination! Beautifully full of art and colour, and I like the curved composition too. The contrast between light & fluffy, and dark & sinister, is also well-thought-out.

“The Zodiac Prince” is a rare story with a male protagonist. He is sent to Earth by his long-suffering father (the Zodiac King, of course) because he was too lazy to do his allotted job properly, namely handing out talents that should have been assigned at birth to girl children between certain dates. That means that his mission (whether he accepts it or no) is to belatedly give out talents to girls between 8 and 15. He does this, rather randomly I must say, with a whirl of his massive medallion; and as this is a humour strip he causes chaos on his way, with everything ending happily after the chaos subsides. Of course he has to have a human girl as sidekick; this is his friend Shrimp, who is one of the earliest victims of his chaos-causing and still puts up with him (while giving him a well-deserved ear-bashing on occasion too).

In contrast, “Shadow on the Fen” is a proper spooky spooky story. Linden James is a mopey teen who’s gone down in the world because of her dad’s illness; they had to move to a rural location and she misses her old friends and way of life. She wishes for a friend at the old wishing tree; a flash of light and someone who has far more serious problems appears: Rebecca has been whisked into the 20th century from the 17th, where / when she was running for her life from an angry mob who thought she was a witch. They were incited by her evil cousin, Matthew Hobley, ‘the Witchfinder’ – and it seems he may also have found a way to travel in time after his quarry!

“Two Mothers for Maggie” has no magic or fantasy elements: it is part kitchen-sink drama, part literal soap opera. Maggie Jones has got a part in a long-running tv soap and is tasting fame and fortune as a result; co-star and screen ‘mother’ Simone Keyes is mentoring and teaching her lots. It seems however that Simone may be trying to encourage Maggie away from her real family, with the best intentions in the world… but with no appreciation of those important ties. This is a stronger story than the wish-fulfilment “Jackie’s Two Lives“: at heart it is about inequality and injustice.

Stories in this issue:

  • Concrete Surfer (writer Pat Mills)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Two Mothers For Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare! (artist Phil Townsend)
  • The Zodiac Prince(artist Trini Tinturé)
  • Paula’s Puppets (artist Julian Vivas)
  • Shadow on the Fen (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)

Jinty 11 February 1978

Jinty 11 February 1978

Stories in this issue:

  • Come Into My Parlour (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Two Mothers For Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare! (artist Phil Townsend)
  • Concrete Surfer (writer Pat Mills)
  • Paula’s Puppets (artist Julian Vivas)
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)

Spooky story “Come Into My Parlour” finishes this week: it is a story of possession and witchcraft drawn atmospherically by Douglas Perry. The evil character in this story is an old witch, a real gruesome hag; next week sees a new story being drawn by the same artist but with the evil being supplied in by a witch-hunter, who is superficially smoother and sleeker, but just as menacing and villainous underneath.

Also finishing is “Land of No Tears“, the science fiction classic that was so popular a reprint was demanded. Pat Mills was clearly busy at this time, because out of the three or four stories he wrote for Jinty, two of them overlap in this issue: “Concrete Surfer” is not one covered in detail in this blog yet, though its time will come. It has great action art and a gung-ho message; a mixture of class warfare and daredevil skateboarding action. I wish I knew who the artist was!

Jinty 31 December 1977

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  • Come into My Parlour (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Darling Clementine (artist Richard Neillands, writer Alison Christie)
  • Two Mothers for Maggie (artist Jim Baikie)
  • Guardian of White Horse Hill – final episode (artist Julian Vivas)
  • Snowbound! Gypsy Rose tale (artist Keith Robson)
  • Land of No Tears (artist Guy Peeters, writer Pat Mills)
  • Alley Cat
  • Race for a Fortune

It is the New Years issue, but not in the new year of 1978. As you can see from the date, Jinty is still on the old year of 1977.

New Year goodies include part one of a pull-out Jinty calendar, and it’s resolution time in Alley Cat. Spotty Muchloot resolves never to let Alley Cat give him the run-around again. He starts off his resolution by giving Alley Cat a bashing while wearing protective gear. But Alley Cat gets the last laugh on Spotty, as usual, and Spotty resolves never to make new year resolutions again. Sounds like a resolution that is more sensible and easier to keep!

The first (Phil Townsend) story for 1978 is Waking Nightmare. It starts in the next issue, replacing White Horse of Guardian Hill, the Jinty story to finish on the last day of 1977. But it will be a while yet before we see other new stories in 1978. The current ones are still going strong and Darling Clementine is only on its second episode.

 

Jinty 29 April 1978

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  • Concrete Surfer (writer Pat Mills)
  • Sue’s Fantastic Fun-Bag! (artist Hugh Thornton-Jones)
  • Slave of the Swan (artist Guy Peeters)
  • Alley Cat
  • Waking Nightmare (artist Phil Townsend)
  • The Zodiac Prince (artist Trini Tinturé)
  • The Birds – first episode (artist Keith Robson)
  • Shadow on the Fen (artist Douglas Perry)
  • Cathy’s Casebook (artist Terry Aspin)

Alfred Hitchcock meets Jinty in this issue, which begins the first episode of The Birds. Strangely, this story, like The Changeling, only lasted three episodes when there was potential to take it further. But unlike The Changeling it has the standard three pages.

Waking Nightmare is on its penultimate episode. Phil’s trapped under some rubble and confused Carol needs to get a doctor. But she is still terrified of doctors, hence the dilemma that leaves the penultimate episode on its cliffhanger.

The Concrete Surfer gets a skateboarding club going, but her slippery, smarmy cousin Carol steals the credit. And when Jean tries to get some fun in with the other members, Carol triumphs yet again when the teacher is not impressed.

Progress is made in Shadow on the Fen when the Witchfinder’s wand is destroyed. Unfortunately the girls couldn’t get to his knife and book of spells, so the Shadow is still out there.

Cathy’s in big trouble. She left the phone off the hook so her dad won’t be bothered on his night off. Unfortunately this caused dad to miss an emergency call and Cathy unwittingly put a boy’s life in danger! Fortunately the boy pulls through, but it’s a lesson Cathy won’t forget. Later in the episode, Cathy finds an emergency of her own, and it is up to her to fetch help.

The Slave is becoming ever more ensnared in the power of the Swan. The Swan has created a false past for her Slave and now is adding “thief” to that past to stir things up for her.

The Zodiac Prince stands in for a clown, who is one unhappy clown with a broken heart. Shrimp warns the Prince that being a circus clown is not as easy as he thinks, and the blurb on what happens next week indicates that she is right.